Almarestäkets Castle Ruins

Stäket, Sweden

Almarestäkets castle was built in the 1100s to protect the Sigtuna and Uppsala cities. It was also called as St. Erik's castle after Eric IX. Throughout the Middle Ages there was a struggle between the Crown and Church who can control the castle.

The castle was first mentioned in the late 1300s. In 1440 got Archbishop Nicolaus Ragvaldi permission to build a new castle, which was completed about ten years later. In the 1510s troubles Almarestäkets was in possession of Bishop Gustav Trolle between 1516-17. The castle was sieged by his main enemy Sten Sture the Younger in 1517. Archbishop Gustav Trolle locked himself in there to avoid trial, and the Swedish government demanded and carried out the demolition of the fortress. The procedure was formally unauthorized because at the time State property was to be separate from Church property. As a revenge for this and other perceived injustices, Trolle, assisted by the Danish King Christian II, took revenge in the Stockholm Bloodbath of 1520.

Today there are visible traces of castle foundations with potholes filled with stone and occasional bricks.

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Details

Founded: 1440s
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Kalmar Union (Sweden)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yasin Demir (2 years ago)
Historiskt plats
Sten Kjellstrom (2 years ago)
Fantastiskt avkopplande miljö.
Nico (3 years ago)
Mycket trevlig konferansanläggning. Brisen från ladan var sådär på kvällen.
Johnny Larsson (3 years ago)
Var där på hundutställning fin plats och omgivningar.
Thies Eggers (3 years ago)
Super trevligt ställe! Rekommenderas!
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