Tunaborgen is a ruined former bishop castle. In 1291 Archbishop Nils Alleson mentioned a fortification on the site. The fort was also a strategic point in the Gustav Vasa's war against the Danes.

The ruins were rediscovered around 1920. The castle consisted of a square tower, a citadel, built together with an almost square walls and it was surrounded by a circular moat. Today the ground floor remains.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

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3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ragna Engqvist (4 years ago)
Det ser inte så märkvärdigt ut. Men... Leta vidare i historien och Månghundraleden, vikingar, sjöstad och platsen har en stor betydelse
Kjell Cronwall (4 years ago)
Mycket intressant plats. Bra informationstavlor.
Jan Ternau (4 years ago)
Intressant. Blir säkert intressantare efter utgrävningarna i augusti.
Tomas Johansson (4 years ago)
Inte mycket kvar att se av denna gamla borg från 1200-talet, även kallad Tunaborgen, men har man vägarna förbi så är det värt att kolla in. Den är förseglad med ett tak och låst så man får nöja sig med att titta in genom de gamla fönsterna (dock verkar det som att det går att låna nyckeln som en annan skrev i sin recension). Ett tag sen jag var här nu, Juni 2014 tror jag, så vet ej om något har ändrats.
Joakim Troëng (6 years ago)
A 13th century fortress ruin that played a big part of the pre-Vasa freedom war against Denmark. The key can be borrowed from the local tourist info or local library.
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