Tunaborgen is a ruined former bishop castle. In 1291 Archbishop Nils Alleson mentioned a fortification on the site. The fort was also a strategic point in the Gustav Vasa's war against the Danes.

The ruins were rediscovered around 1920. The castle consisted of a square tower, a citadel, built together with an almost square walls and it was surrounded by a circular moat. Today the ground floor remains.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ragna Engqvist (2 years ago)
Det ser inte så märkvärdigt ut. Men... Leta vidare i historien och Månghundraleden, vikingar, sjöstad och platsen har en stor betydelse
Kjell Cronwall (2 years ago)
Mycket intressant plats. Bra informationstavlor.
Jan Ternau (2 years ago)
Intressant. Blir säkert intressantare efter utgrävningarna i augusti.
Tomas Johansson (2 years ago)
Inte mycket kvar att se av denna gamla borg från 1200-talet, även kallad Tunaborgen, men har man vägarna förbi så är det värt att kolla in. Den är förseglad med ett tak och låst så man får nöja sig med att titta in genom de gamla fönsterna (dock verkar det som att det går att låna nyckeln som en annan skrev i sin recension). Ett tag sen jag var här nu, Juni 2014 tror jag, så vet ej om något har ändrats.
Joakim Troëng (4 years ago)
A 13th century fortress ruin that played a big part of the pre-Vasa freedom war against Denmark. The key can be borrowed from the local tourist info or local library.
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Ängsö Castle

Ängsö Castle was first named as "Engsev" in a royal charter by king Canute I of Sweden (r. 1167-1196), in which he stated that he had inherited the property after his father Eric IX of Sweden. Until 1272, it was owned by the Riseberga Abbey, and then taken over by Gregers Birgersson.

From 1475 until 1710, it was owned by the Sparre family. The current castle was built as a fortress by riksråd Bengt Fadersson Sparre in the 1480s. In 1522, Ängsö Castle was taken after a siege by king Gustav Vasa, since its owner, Fadersson's son Knut Bengtsson, sided with Christian II of Denmark. However, in 1538 it was given by the king to Bengtsson's daughter Hillevi Knutsdotter, who was married to Arvid Trolle.

In 1710, the castle was taken over by Carl Piper and Christina Piper. Ängsö Castle was owned by the Piper family from 1710 until 1971, and is now owned by the Westmanna foundation. The castle building itself was made into a museum in 1959 and was made a listed building in 1965. It is currently opened to visitors during the summers.

The castle is a cubical building in four stores made by stone and bricks. The lower parts is preserved from the middle ages. It was redecorated and expanded in the 1630s. The 4th storey as well as the roof is from the expansion of Carl Hårleman from 1740-41. It gained its current appearance in the 1740s.