Dwasieden Dolmen

Sassnitz, Germany

The Great dolmen of Dwasieden was excavated in 1970 by Ewald Schuldt. The megalithic site of the Funnelbeaker culture was constructed between 3500 and 2800 B.C. Of the 54 kerb stones - including the four guardian stones - 41 have survived. The rectangular, roughly east-west oriented chamber at the wide end of the frame, with its western entrance and porch consists of seven supporting stones, a half stone the height of the uprights and five slabs, on which there are three large (on the chamber) and three small capstones. Only the central capstone of the chamber is missing. One of the four guardian stones at the southwest end, which had already been overturned in the past, has 40 cup marks, one of the kerb stones has three more. The site is a prime example of the porch dolmen, typical of this region. A two-metre-long porch runs past the support-high half stone to the 4.0 metre long, 1.7 metre wide and 1.4 metre high chamber. The hall consists of red sandstone slabs, annealed flint and a clay floor.

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Details

Founded: 3500-2800 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Paleolithic to Neolithic Period (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anna Meister (4 years ago)
The route description from the starting point at Schlossallee was not available. With the help of Google Maps, orientation was easy and the path was easy to walk. At the destination, the large barrow was waiting with a plaque for explanation. Very interesting and should be visited when you are in Sassnitz.
Sven (4 years ago)
Beautiful view
Manfred Konopka (5 years ago)
Beautiful hiking path along the Sassnitz cliff
Sylvia Gottlied (5 years ago)
Very interesting and somehow mystical. Unfortunately not so easy to find.
Andreas Lindemann (5 years ago)
Very beautiful here. We liked it here. Interesting is also the soldiers cemetery and the castle ruins. Likewise the old NVA barracks For historical interests highly recommended
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