Keila Church is the biggest medieval country church in Harju county, which was obviously established shortly after the North Estonia was occupied by Danes. In 1280 a spacious square chapel was established at "Keila hill", where today there is the chancel of the church. Fragments of the paintings at the chancel walls date possibly from this period already. The main body of the church remained unbuilt at the beginning and was obviously established at the first half of the 14th century. As the influence of the Dominican order, the main body of the church was simple unvaulted box-like building.

The church was expanded in the 15th century. First the massive west-tower was built. Three-sided ending was added to the chancel, it was re-vaulted and altar table of stone was made. In 1480 southern portal was established. In 1489 the church was vaulted and it became two-aisled, which is rather seldom in Estonian churches. The church of Keila was destroyed at the Livonian War in 1558 and the interior was stolen. It was restored in 1596.

There are several chapels in the graveyard, which have been built after 1772 due it was no longer allowed to bury inside churches.

Reference: eelk.ee

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.eelk.ee

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aleksandr Gabov (5 months ago)
Very beautiful and interesting
Dmitri Nasennik (6 months ago)
Forgive sins
Leonid Romanov (8 months ago)
A beautiful church, restoration in progress, ancient burials. Kruzensterns rest here.
olepma (11 months ago)
Church with mighty chapels, the oldest crosses from about 1600
Oleg Tal (2 years ago)
A very ancient church building and no less historically long-standing cemetery around the temple, where gravestones of the 16th and even 15th centuries are still preserved. This is a real open-air museum. The state of the cemetery is depressing. Moss-covered slabs, stolen crosses, a destroyed fence, although you cannot see this from the front door. Cleanly. Obviously, the famous Museumkites security agency does not stick its bureaucratic nose outside of Tallinn. And local officials have knowledge about the protection of historical monuments at the level of the third grade of the Keila primary school, as anyone who arrives in Keila can be sure of.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Abbey of Saint-Étienne

The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).