Ratzeburg Cathedral

Ratzeburg, Germany

The Cathedral of Ratzeburg, one of the oldest brick churches of Northern Germany, is a basilica with three naves. Its arches are supported by pillars and it is built in the form of a cross with a choir quadrangle and a halfround apse. The last restoration (completed in 1966) returned the cathedral to its late Romanesque conception, so you can discover most of the unity and integrity of its original design.

The cathedral was founded in 1154, when Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony, and Hartwich I, Archbishop of Hamburg, refounded the episcopal seat of Ratzeburg, and Evermodus became its first bishop. The cathedral was restored, and additions were made to it in the 15th century.

The Cloister, on the north side of the Cathedral, was begun shortly after the completion of the Cathedral (ca. 1220). The cloistered courtyard is open for the public.

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Details

Founded: 1154
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

juniiee (3 years ago)
Beautiful huge Dom with well taken care off cemetery at the front compound. Also, a beautiful lion statue. The inside of the Dom is beautiful, with pipes of organ, simply beautiful! One side of the front Dom is under renovation.
Moritz Lohmann (4 years ago)
Ancient heritage site with intriguing vibes
Jalal Al-Oklah (4 years ago)
Simply amazing
abhishek khosla (5 years ago)
Great always special feel when I go there
Jeanette Ziegenbalg (5 years ago)
Impressive structure with views over the lakes and old town
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