Hasselburg estate is located on a site of fortified manor house from the late Middle Ages. The mansion was originally a typical for Holstein, surrounded by moats and in the 18th century reconstructed into a Baroque residence. The mansion is a two-storey building and with illusionistic ceiling paintings. The large gatehouse of 1763 was based on a design of Georg Hofer Gregg. It is one of the largest gatehouses in Schleswig-Holstein.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eggert Kaiser (2 years ago)
Toller Hof, mit Ferienwohnungen, Musikveranstaltungen in der größten Reetdachscheune Europas...oder der ganzen Welt? Wie mir berichtet wurde ist es die größte musikalisch genutzte Reetdachscheune der Welt. Im Herrenhaus wohnt die weltberühmte Produzentin von Hörspielen Heikedine Körting
Sabine Hoffmann (2 years ago)
Tolle Location, Sherlock musical war super
Alexander Körting (2 years ago)
Tolles Landgut - sehr sehenswert - super Veranstaltungen
Delfine Swimmingpool (2 years ago)
Das Musical war super. Das Catering naja. Das weitere Rahmenprogramm nicht vorhanden. Das historische Gut schön in der Restaurationsphase.
Torsten Ettl (2 years ago)
Sehr schön. Empfehlenswert. Zuvor Veranstaltungen prüfen.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Easter Aquhorthies Stone Circle

Easter Aquhorthies stone circle, located near Inverurie, is one of the best-preserved examples of a recumbent stone circle, and one of the few that still have their full complement of stones. It consists of a ring of nine stones, eight of which are grey granite and one red jasper. Two more grey granite stones flank a recumbent of red granite flecked with crystals and lines of quartz. The circle is particularly notable for its builders' use of polychromy in the stones, with the reddish ones situated on the SSW side and the grey ones opposite.

The placename Aquhorthies derives from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning 'field of prayer', and may indicate a 'long continuity of sanctity' between the Stone or Bronze Age circle builders and their much later Gaelic successors millennia later. The circle's surroundings were landscaped in the late 19th century, and it sits within a small fenced and walled enclosure. A stone dyke, known as a roundel, was built around the circle some time between 1847 and 1866–7.