St. Catherine's Church

Lübeck, Germany

St. Catherine Church is a Brick Gothic church which belonged to a former Franciscan monastery in the name of Saint Catherine of Alexandria. The Church was built in the early 14th century. It is part of the Lübeck world heritage and used as a museum church and exhibition hall by the Lübeck museums since 1980.

The exhibits include a copy of Saint George and the Dragon made by Bernt Notke for Storkyrkan in Stockholms Gamla Stan, an Epitaph by Godfrey Kneller in memory of his father and another one by Tintoretto, the Resurrection of Lazarus.

Some the former altars, like Hermen Rodes St. Luke altar, are on permanent exhibit in the St. Annen Museum in Lübeck.

The facade is decorated with 20th-century clinker brick sculptures by Ernst Barlach and Gerhard Marcks.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vinay Kulkarni (2 years ago)
Nice church. Old vintage construction. Maintained beautifully.
Michael Drügg (3 years ago)
Worth seeing church which is now a museum. Admission of EUR 2.00 per person is reasonable
Nanne RvE (3 years ago)
Beautiful church, very interesting raised choir
GS Dani (3 years ago)
A beautiful church, with elegant statues, and very good for classic music concerts ?
Wolfgang Prof.Dr.med. Dieing (3 years ago)
Very nice "quarter to twelve" concerts
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls

The Amphitheatre of the Three Gauls was part of the federal sanctuary of the three Gauls dedicated to the cult of Rome and Augustus celebrated by the 60 Gallic tribes when they gathered at Lugdunum (Lyon). The amphitheatre was built at the foot of the La Croix-Rousse hill at what was then the confluence of the Rhône and Saône.

Excavations have revealed a basement of three elliptical walls linked by cross-walls and a channel surrounding the oval central arena. The arena was slightly sloped, with the building"s south part supported by a now-vanished vault. The arena"s dimensions are 67,6m by 42m. This phase of the amphitheatre housed games which accompanied the imperial cult, with its low capacity (1,800 seats) being enough for delegations from the 60 Gallic tribes.

The amphitheatre was expanded at the start of the 2nd century. Two galleries were added around the old amphitheatre, raising its width from 25 metres to 105 metres and its capacity to about 20,000 seats. In so doing it made it a building open to the whole population of Lugdunum and its environs.