Memento Park is an open-air museum in Budapest, dedicated to monumental statues from Hungary's Communist period (1949–1989). There are statues of Lenin, Marx, and Engels, as well as several Hungarian Communist leaders. The park was designed by Hungarian architect Ákos Eleőd, who won the competition announced by the Budapest General Assembly in 1991.

Memento Park is divided into two sections: Statue Park, officially named “A Sentence About Tyranny” Park after a poem of the same name by Gyula Ilyés, and Witness Square (also called 'Neverwas Square'). Statue Park houses 42 of the statues that were removed from Budapest after the fall of communism. Witness Square holds a replica of Stalin's Boots which became a symbol of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 after the statue of Stalin was pulled down from its pedestal in 1956.

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Founded: 1991
Category: Museums in Hungary

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Beth Gabor (12 months ago)
Fascinating & important place. I love that Stalin's boots recreation are outside the gates and free for all to see.
Balazs Vincze (13 months ago)
Overall liked it. But this place could attract foreign tourists, with more signs placed in English. Perhaps subtitle the cinema in English. And I know this is just me, but a T34 placed somewhere would attract many more children. However I know the parks resources are limited.
Marc Codreanu (13 months ago)
Interesting to see and learn the history of Communism in Hungary.
Kamil Brzakala (14 months ago)
A great idea. The park it self is quite small it's only around 20 sculptures but some of them like Stalin's shoes are quite impressive. There's also an informative exhibition in a tent outside.
Michael Monaco (19 months ago)
A very interesting and culturally enlightening experience. I visited with my wife and her family and we had a great time. It’s a bit of a trip out of the city which we really liked. Great atmosphere and when we visited it was a bit drizzly which gave it a very USSR feel.
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