Wroclaw Cathedral

Wrocław, Poland

The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist is a landmark of the city of Wrocław in Poland. The current standing cathedral is the fourth church to have been built on the site. A first church at the location of the present cathedral was built under Přemyslid rule in the mid 10th century, a fieldstone building with one nave about 25 m in length, including a distinctive transept and an apse. After the Polish conquest of Silesia and the founding of the Wrocław diocese under the Piast duke Bolesław I Chrobry about 1000, this Bohemian church was replaced by a larger basilical structure with three naves, a crypt, and towers on its eastern side. The first cathedral was however soon destroyed, probably by the invading troops of Duke Bretislaus of Bohemia around 1039. A larger, Romanesque-style church was soon built in its place in the times of Duke Casimir I, and expanded similar to Płock Cathedral on the behest of Bishop Walter of Malonne in 1158.

After the end of the Mongol invasion, the church was again largely rebuilt in the present-day Brick Gothic style. It was the first building of the city to be made of brick when construction of the new choir and ambulatory started in 1244. The nave with sacristy and the basements of the prominent western steeples were added under Bishop Nanker until 1341.

On June 19, 1540, a fire destroyed the roof, which was restored 16 years later in Renaissance style. Another fire on June 9, 1759, burnt the towers, roof, sacristy, and quire. The damage was slowly repaired during the following 150 years. In the 19th century, Karl Lüdecke rebuilt the interior and western side in neogothic style. Further work was done at the beginning of the 20th century by Hugo Hartung, especially on the towers ruined during the 1759 fire.

The cathedral was almost entirely destroyed (about 70% of the construction) during the Siege of Breslau and heavy bombing by the Red Army in the last days of World War II. Parts of the interior fittings were saved and are now on display at the National Museum in Warsaw. The initial reconstruction of the church lasted until 1951, when it was reconsecrated by Archbishop Stefan Wyszyński. In the following years, additional aspects were rebuilt and renovated. The original, conical shape of the towers was restored only in 1991.

The cathedral holds the largest pipe organ in Poland, built in 1913 by E.F. Walcker & Sons of Ludwigsburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, for the Centennial Hall — formerly the largest organ in the world.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Grzegorz De (2 years ago)
Interesting place to visit while exploring Wroclaw. There is a view spot at the top.
John Smith (2 years ago)
The church is free, but they do charge to go up the lift to the top of the tower. It is worth it for one of the best views over Wrocław, and 360° panoramic views of the City. The guy on the lift is a bit humourless, but he has to ferry tourists up and down all day!
Esra Duru (2 years ago)
The Cathedral is near to river and ambiance is really nice, you can also visit the top of Cathedral with an amazing view, the price was 5 zl for students but you should show your student id in the entrance , if you come Wroclaw visit it ,
Artur Kaleta (2 years ago)
The top of this cathedral is one of the best viewpoints of Wrocław. What's even more important - it's cheaper than Sky Tower (only 7 zł) and situated in much better location to see the city center.
Nikolas Hiday (2 years ago)
The cathedral is very interesting. looking at its walls, decoration, statues on the facade, you immediately feel the spirit of the past. Be sure to read the legends associated with the cathedral. Of these you will learn a lot of interesting things. Also, you should walk around the cathedral, look into the old sentry, built to the wall of the cathedral. In the cathedral there is a staircase to the observation deck. lifting to the very top paid, but in the middle there is a free museum, even if you did not buy a ticket to the observation deck, sign and inspect the museum.
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