St. Elizabeth's Church

Wrocław, Poland

St. Elizabeth's Church dates back to the 14th century, when construction was commissioned by the city. The main tower was originally 130 meters tall. From 1525 until 1946, St. Elizabeth's was the chief Lutheran Church of Breslau/Wroclaw and Silesia. In 1946 it was expropriated and given to the Military Chaplaincy of the Polish Roman Catholic Church. The church was damaged by heavy hail in 1529, and gutted by fire in 1976. The church's renowned organ was destroyed. The reconstructed main tower is now 91,5 meters tall. An observation deck near the top is open to the public. Since 1999 there is a memorial on the church property to Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a native of the city (then Breslau, Germany) and martyr to the anti-Nazi Cause.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kateřina Mašínová (11 months ago)
The tower outlook is spectacular. Firstly you need climb up many stairs but the staircase isn’t that steep and in comparison to some different towers you have enough space to go.
Luke Underwood (2 years ago)
Awesome tower to climb and only 7zl
Yu Jen Shih (2 years ago)
Omg staircases.... Be careful to all visitors, it is very laborious and tiring. Dangerous as well. But the view is breathtaking and splendid
Abhishek Ghosh (2 years ago)
Here there are many nice statues.
Attila Tényi (2 years ago)
Beautiful church in the heart of the city.
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