St. Elizabeth's Church

Wrocław, Poland

St. Elizabeth's Church dates back to the 14th century, when construction was commissioned by the city. The main tower was originally 130 meters tall. From 1525 until 1946, St. Elizabeth's was the chief Lutheran Church of Breslau/Wroclaw and Silesia. In 1946 it was expropriated and given to the Military Chaplaincy of the Polish Roman Catholic Church. The church was damaged by heavy hail in 1529, and gutted by fire in 1976. The church's renowned organ was destroyed. The reconstructed main tower is now 91,5 meters tall. An observation deck near the top is open to the public. Since 1999 there is a memorial on the church property to Pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a native of the city (then Breslau, Germany) and martyr to the anti-Nazi Cause.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sascha Vogel (14 months ago)
View from the tower is great, right next to the market square. 300 steps to the top are worth it, entrance fee is 10 Zloty per person.
Sascha Vogel (14 months ago)
View from the tower is great, right next to the market square. 300 steps to the top are worth it, entrance fee is 10 Zloty per person.
ilyas namozov (16 months ago)
Old tower within this church is open to enter and climb to the top through cycling middle-age stairs. On the top you can observe the city and beyond. Very recommended for a stunning views. But bear in mind: the stairs are steep and the climb is tough.
ilyas namozov (16 months ago)
Old tower within this church is open to enter and climb to the top through cycling middle-age stairs. On the top you can observe the city and beyond. Very recommended for a stunning views. But bear in mind: the stairs are steep and the climb is tough.
dixtody (16 months ago)
The main tower was originally 130 meters tall! it's incredible!
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