Wroclaw Town Hall

Wrocław, Poland

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.

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Details

Founded: c. 1300
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Poland

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wojciech Szewczyk (21 months ago)
It's fortunate that Wroclaw's Town Hall survived the ravages of Poland's tumultuous history; the same cannot be said of other cities' town halls (e.g. Krakow). Wroclaw's Town Hall has an imposing roof, with multiple towers. Inside, the ground floor has a beautiful vaulted ceiling, though large signboards ruin what could've been a wonderful shot for Instagram. Upstairs, there's no such problem - the halls upstairs lets you imagine civic life in Poland centuries ago. You can enjoy beautiful views of the Market Square through stained glass windows. Both the Grand Hall and the multiple chambers have been beautifully restored.
oha dros (21 months ago)
Only nice on the outside. In the entrance i was told that its for locals and not tourists
김완수 (2 years ago)
I was there at night and opend Christmas market. night sight was so beautiful. I strongly suggest you to visit there at night.
Mark K (2 years ago)
The square was awesome, loved it here. They were setting up for some event, so did not go inside.
Kathy Duncan (2 years ago)
Wonderful view. Panorama of Wroclaw. I recommend to everyone, but very sorry for such a heavy lift. Nobody warned that it would be so difficult
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