St. Mary Magdalene Church

Wrocław, Poland

St. Mary Magdalene Church was established in the 13th century. During the Second World War the church was seriously damaged. In 1945 the legendary Sinner's Bell, which was the biggest Silesian bell, was also damaged. St Mary Magdalene was rebuilt during the period 1947–1953.

The most precious relic of the church is a Romanesque portal dating from the 12th century, coming from a Benedictine monastery in Ołbin that had been torn down in the 16th century.

The bridge connecting the two towers is called the 'Mostek Czarownic' (Witches’ Bridge). A legend says that the shadows visible on the bridge are the souls of the girls who used to seduce men without wanting to be married, being scared of housekeeping. Indeed, shadows represent women with brooms in their hands.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brian Spoorendonk (10 months ago)
Great view on the city and a must do. It’s not the best viewpoint, but it’s a nice one!
Revathy Murali (10 months ago)
One of the best viewpoint in Wroclaw from where you can admire the beauty of the city. 8zl per person, but worth the price. Need to climb some 250 steps to reach the top.
Breno Teixeira (10 months ago)
Amazing view. infinite stairs to reach the top of it but it's worth it.
Luka Kurjački (11 months ago)
Amazing catherdal, really worth visiting.
dixtody (12 months ago)
It's unusual for me to look at the roof of a church from such a close proximity. The view is beautiful. But the view from St. Elizabeth's will be better)
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