Kraków Barbican

Kraków, Poland

The Kraków Barbican is a fortified outpost once connected to the city walls. It is a historic gateway leading into the Old Town of Kraków. The barbican is one of the few remaining relics of the complex network of fortifications and defensive barriers that once encircled the royal city. It currently serves as a tourist attraction and venue for a variety of exhibitions.

The Gothic-style barbican, built around 1498, is one of only three such fortified outposts still surviving in Europe, and the best preserved. It is a moated cylindrical brick structure with an inner courtyard 24.4 meters in diameter, and seven turrets. Its 3-meter-thick walls hold 130 embrasures. The barbican was originally linked to the city walls by a covered passageway that led through St. Florian"s Gate and served as a checkpoint for all who entered the city.

On its eastern wall, a tablet commemorates the feat of a Kraków burgher, Marcin Oracewicz, who, during the Bar Confederation, defended the town against the Russians and shot their Colonel Panin. Masterpiece of medieval military engineering, with its circular fortress, was added to the city"s fortifications along the coronation route in the late 15th century.

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Founded: 1498
Category: Castles and fortifications in Poland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomer Grinberg (2 years ago)
impresive...and the old city is just behind it
germàn alfonso fino (3 years ago)
It's a wonderful place, if you come to Kraków you must to visit this place
stan switkowski (3 years ago)
Kraków is very beautiful with great history around it.
Rob Szarek (3 years ago)
A brick fort made of bricks surrounded by a dry moat. Very nice to look at, unfortunately the museum was closed when I visited at about 5 pm. It is a popular spot since the Barbican is surrounded by a park and there are several food stands nearby for snacks and drinks.
John Smith (3 years ago)
It wasn't open to visitors when I walked around it, but it's a very impressive keep, part of the ancient defenses of Krakow which has been developed as a status symbol of the city over the centuries! I recommend going in the morning before it's too hot to walk around in summer
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