Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.

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Founded: c. 1044
Category: Religious sites in Poland

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

David Mesa Noack (15 months ago)
You can get here by bike from Krakow and enjoy its beautiful views. Nice coffee inside the Abbey. There’s a shop too, cookies are great, beer not that much.
D. S. (2 years ago)
A beautiful historic place with a lot to offer including a wonderful view of the river. Many people come every weekend to enjoy this place and the nature around it. Unfortunately, the nature around it is being destroyed. Trash is everywhere - bottles, cans, plastics, paper, threads, bags, other random stuff. It would be great if Abbey staff and local business owners would join forces and clean it up minimum 2,3 times a year, plus work on educating the visitors not just about the history of the place, but of nature preservation. I am sure that with some effort, volunteers could be gathered and the whole place could be cleaned in 1 weekend. I would happily participate in such weekend event.
D. S. (2 years ago)
A beautiful historic place with a lot to offer including a wonderful view of the river. Many people come every weekend to enjoy this place and the nature around it. Unfortunately, the nature around it is being destroyed. Trash is everywhere - bottles, cans, plastics, paper, threads, bags, other random stuff. It would be great if Abbey staff and local business owners would join forces and clean it up minimum 2,3 times a year, plus work on educating the visitors not just about the history of the place, but of nature preservation. I am sure that with some effort, volunteers could be gathered and the whole place could be cleaned in 1 weekend. I would happily participate in such weekend event.
Ashley Wilkinson (2 years ago)
I rode my bike along the south side of the river from Kraków to the Abbey. The trail along the river is really lovely, and the Abbey is also nice. It’s quite small and had a pretty view of the river and farm lands. There’s a little cafe and a store. There’s not much to it besides that. I was expecting it to be a little bit bigger and have a little bit more to it. There WAS a cute Abbey kitty that was very friendly, so that was fun.
Ashley Wilkinson (2 years ago)
I rode my bike along the south side of the river from Kraków to the Abbey. The trail along the river is really lovely, and the Abbey is also nice. It’s quite small and had a pretty view of the river and farm lands. There’s a little cafe and a store. There’s not much to it besides that. I was expecting it to be a little bit bigger and have a little bit more to it. There WAS a cute Abbey kitty that was very friendly, so that was fun.
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