Czorsztyn Castle Ruins

Czorsztyn, Poland

The ruins of Czorsztyn Castle stands at the top of the hill nearby Dunajec. According to Jan Długosz, in 1246 the owner of the castle was Piotr Wydżga. However that theory was never after confirmed by other historians, so the beginnings of castle functioning are dated on 14th century. Large development of the castle took place during the reign of Casimir III the Great. In years 1629–1643, when Jan Baranowski was a starosta of Czorsztyn, the castle was fundamentally rebuilt. In 1790 the roof of the castle burnt after a thunder clap. In the result castle was quickly broken down and became empty.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in Poland

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Vladimír Jančich (2 years ago)
Nice remains of the castle. The view from castle to lake is picturesque. The castle itself is not very big, you can get it done in one hour. Free parking is for 1,5 hour so that fine. From castle you can take a boat to another castle on the other side of the lake.
Nyeste Andras (2 years ago)
If you want to have a cycling trip combined with a boat trip and to see a beautiful castle on the way, this is where you go. Lot of opportunities around the lake. Fantastic!
Exampledan - (2 years ago)
Ruins with old atmosphere of old times
Rogér Dudziec (2 years ago)
Nice Castle with nice views. It is in a very good condition (well maintained).
Dawid Sipowicz (2 years ago)
Great small castle, and if the sky is clear you can see beautiful views as on the attached picture. Entrance was 7pln for an adult.
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