Melsztyn Castle Ruins

Melsztyn, Poland

Construction of the Melsztyn Castle was initiated in 1340, by the castellan of Kraków, Spicymir. In 1362, Bishop Bodzanta blessed the Holy Spirit chapel at the castle. The complex for 200 years remained in the hands of the powerful noble family of Leliwita Melsztyński, which in the late 14th century built a Gothic keep, located in the western wing of the castle. In the 15th century, Melsztyn was one of centers of Polish Hussite movement, and in 1511, Jan Melsztyński sold it to the castellan of Wiślica, Mikołaj Jordan of Myślenice. In ca. 1546, Spytek Jordan ordered remodeling of the Gothic complex, turning it into a Renaissance residence. After the marriages of his two daughters, Melsztyn became the property of the Tarło family, and in 1744, it came into the hands of the Lanckoroński family.

Melsztyn Castle was destroyed by the Russians in 1771, during the Bar Confederation, and has been a ruin since then. In 1789–1796, parts of the complex were pulled down, in order to gain building materials for a church at Domosławice. In the following years, the complex was neglected, which resulted in collapse of the keep (1846). In 1879-85, due to the efforts of Karol Lanckoroński, the castle gained the status of a permanent, protected ruin. Since 2008, it belongs to the gmina of Zakliczyn. The castle has been presented in paintings of Jan Matejko, Napoleon Orda, and Maciej Bogusz Steczyński.

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Founded: 1340
Category: Ruins in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

anna afek (6 months ago)
The castle ruins currently under renovation, very muddy, but the views make it all worth it.
Marcin (9 months ago)
500 expert opinion nice place I often stay there a good place to meet friends before renovation it was also nice ps: greetings to nice employees
Przemyslaw Boris (14 months ago)
Are closed for works
Przemyslaw Boris (14 months ago)
Are closed for works
Seb Juras (19 months ago)
Excellent views
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