Harju-Madise Church

Padise, Estonia

The first sanctuary on the site was a small wooden construction that was replaced by a stone construction in the 15th century. Because of the unique position on a high shore the church tower was also used as a lighthouse.

The present appearance is mostly from 1500-1700’s. During reconstruction work in 1760-80, the choir, vestry and tower were added to the original building. In middle of nineteenth century the Baltic-German noblemen of Padise (then Padis) and Leetse manors wanted to celebrate the coronation of the new czar, Alexander II, so the tower was built even higher and supported by side pillars. Only the western portal of the original church has been preserved to date.

Inside the church the most outstanding elements are a pulpit carved by Johann Valentin Rabe and a painted shrine donated by the landlord of Põllküla.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Address

Kopli tee, Padise, Estonia
See all sites in Padise

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.7is7.com

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ragnar Siimberg (13 months ago)
Nice
Anton Garin (13 months ago)
Тихое место, далеко от города. Туристов особо не бывает.
Matthias Bolliger (2 years ago)
Ilus maakirik looduslikult kaunis kohas.
marquis Okk (2 years ago)
Sümpaatne väikekirik, pärit juba 15.sajandi keskelt
Andrus Nau (2 years ago)
Ilus ja huvitav koht
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