Paldiski Fortress

Paldiski, Estonia

Swedish conquerors established a sea fortress named Rågövik (“Rye Island Bay”) to the deep and wind-sheltered Paldiski Bay in the 17th century. Later it became a Russian naval base in the 18th century. Peter the Great planned to build a giant military port of there. The plan envisaged that the mole would offer shelter for the entire vast navy of Russia. Construction of the military port started in 1716. Despite the efforts of thousands of convicts, the planned 2-km-long giant facility could not be completed and even the completed part was quite soon destroyed by autumn storms.

In 1762, the Russians (Catherine II) renamed the sea fortress of Rogerwiek into Baltiyskiy Port (Baltic Port), and the Estonian pronounciation, Paldiski, became the official name in 1933. In 1962, Paldiski became a Soviet Navy nuclear submarine training centre. With two land-based nuclear reactors, and employing some 16,000 people, it was the largest such facility in the Soviet Union. Because of its importance, the whole city was closed off with barbed wire until the last Russian warship left in August 1994. Russia finally relinquished control of the nuclear reactor facilities in September 1995.

References: DirectFerries.co.uk, North Estonian Klint

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Address

Paemurru, Paldiski, Estonia
See all sites in Paldiski

Details

Founded: 1716
Category: Ruins in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Swedish Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kirsi Paakkinen (2 years ago)
Good place for swimming dog
Margit Kallaste (2 years ago)
Omapärane koht inimesele kes armastab metsikut loodust
Александр Розанов (2 years ago)
Горки как горки.
Kaido Liivrand (2 years ago)
Ilusaid vaatamisväärseid kohti veel on.
tiina e (2 years ago)
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