Schadeck Castle Ruins

Neckarsteinach, Germany

Schadeck Castle is the most recent and smallest, but still most interesting of the four Neckarstein castles. It is perched on the high mountain like a bird's nest, which is why it is, in fact, called the 'Swallow's Nest'. After Ulrich II (1236-1257) inherited the 'front castle' from his father Ulrich I and another son joined the clergy, Bligger V, the third son, was forced to build a new castle. However, there was no more room on the mountain ridge where the other castles stood and thus he had to erect it downstream from the front castle on the slopes of the rocky massif that drop steeply to the Neckar River. This location must have caused enormous difficulties during the construction. To save the level ground for the castle complex and provide it with a frontal ditch as protection against the mountainside, a large chunk of the steep rock face had to be hewn out.

The castle itself stands on a rocky basement and appears to literally grow out of the mountain. Along the top of the high curtain wall, the most likely place to be attacked, runs a covered wall-walk with little towers on both sides. They command a panoramic view of the Neckar River valley and the impressive walled town of Dilsberg. Visitors to the castle today walk along a path from Neckarsteinach, which leads through the former frontal ditch. Earlier access was by way of a steep serpentine path from the Neckar. Today the ruin is the property of the state of Hesse and was recently restored at great cost. It can be viewed at any time free of charge and the curtain wall can be climbed.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.burgenstrasse.de

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rosa Vargas (2 years ago)
Beautiful view!
Koeka (2 years ago)
Great day to explore the castles and its wooded trails to escape an enduring heatwave.. There is a parking lot adjacent to the trail leading to the castles however I would not recommend it if you have walking challenges as the trail is sandy, a bit rocky with no hand support. The occupied castle does have a better access to the trails.. Worth exploring. No one was around either
O.Rydzyk (2 years ago)
siała baba mak.
Pedro Salas (2 years ago)
Nice place to walk and have a view of the region
Conrad Logan (3 years ago)
Amazing view of Neckarsteinach and the Neckar river.
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