Weinsberg Castle Ruins

Weinsberg, Germany

Weinsberg castle was established on a mountain at the trade route running from Heilbronn to Schwäbisch Hall around the year 1000. In 1140 the castle was besieged by Konrad III in the course of the struggles between the Staufers and the Welfs. Finally it had to surrender on December 21, 1140, since the army of Welf VI to release the castle had been defeated by the Staufers in a battle. According to the report of the Chronica regia Coloniensis, the women of the castle were granted free departure and allowed to take what they could carry on their backs. They carried down their men, and so saved their lives, since the king adhered to his word. The women became known as treue Weiber ('loyal women'). The castle (today's ruin) is called Weibertreu due to this occurrence.

On April 16, 1525 (Easter Sunday), during the German Peasants' War, the peasants attacked and destroyed the castle, which was already damaged from an earlier attack in 1504. They then proceeded to execute the nobleman who had been in command of both town and castle and who had treated the peasants very badly several times before.

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Details

Founded: c. 1000
Category: Ruins in Germany
Historical period: Ottonian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Clive Angelo Gerada (12 months ago)
Nice place for en-plen air!
Ciaran Brooks (2 years ago)
Walked from Heilbronn, approx 1 hour and a quarter each way. The walk takes you through the vineyards and is attractive. The castle itself was well preserved with plenty of information (albeit in German) available. There was no entrance fee for the winter months. From the ramparts you can get a good 360° view of the surrounding area.
DarkGhost 80 (2 years ago)
Very nice place!
Tejendra Raj (2 years ago)
It's ruiens of whatever remains of the castle. Costs 2 euro for entry. One can spend about 20minutes within to see the all the remaining parts
Nabeel ur Rehman (4 years ago)
An interesting part of history! Worth visiting and it had an interesting background story ;)
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