Tiefburg Castle Ruins

Heidelberg, Germany

It is not known exactly when the Tiefburg castle was built or by whom. It is assumed that it was built in the 12th century, possibly by the Abbey of Lorsch or the Count Palatinates of the Rhine (later known as the Prince Electors of the Palatinate), who set up residence in nearby Heidelberg around this time. It is also possible that the castle had its origins in a fortiied estate. The knights of Handschuhsheim who lived in the Tiefburg were initially unfree knights, known as ministeriales, in the service of the Abbey of Lorsch, and later on vassals of the Prince Electors of the Palatinate. The dynasty died out when the last knight of Handschuhsheim, Johannes (Hans) V., died aged 16 on 31st December 1600 from injuries sustained in a duel. Through inheritance, the Tiefburg became the property of the barons of Helmstatt (who became counts of Helmstatt in the 18th century).

Tiefburg was badly damaged in the Thirty Years‘ War. In 1689 it fell victim to the War of the Palatine Succession and became uninhabitable, whereupon the Helmstatts built a new residence in the immediate vicinity. The original gate of this new residence can still be seen to the east of the square in front of the Tiefburg. Count Raban von Helmstatt had the Tiefburg restored in the years 1910 to 1913.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.tiefburg.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

terry halpin (4 years ago)
Breathtaking views beautiful Heidelberg
TheLanguageunites (4 years ago)
beautiful place...
Andre De Wet (4 years ago)
Beautiful , safe, quite yet active with things to see and do.
Damir Rafikov (5 years ago)
Beautiful small castle. But was closed.
Greg Lightfoot (5 years ago)
Great little castle! Lots of events happen here! Farmers market on Saturday here too!
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