Schattenburg Castle

Feldkirch, Austria

Schattenburg castle was mentioned in the chronicle by the monks Ortlieb and Berthold in 1138. Muntifurt Castle, mentioned in the first half of the 12th century, may have housed vassals of the Earl of Bregenz, who ruled over the area at the time. At his coming to power (1182) the Earl Hugo I, the grandson of the last Earl of Bregenz Rudolf (1150), repositioned his residence to Feldkirch Castle, important for reasons of power politics and the control of traffic.

For 200 years, the Castle remained the property of the Earls of Montfort. Upon the death of the last of the Montforts, Rudolf IV (1390), the castle and the power that came with it passed to the Habsburgs. The Habsburgs ruled the estate through governors who lived in the Castle until 1773.

Only from 1416 until 1436 was their rule briefly interrupted, when it came into the hands of the Earls of Toggenburg. Duke Friedrich of Austria’s help in the flight of the antipope Johannes XIII turned out to be fatal for him. Not only was he outlawed in the name of the Emperor and excommunicated, he also lost all is possessions, among which Feldkirch. In 1825 the City bought the partially ruined Castle from the state for 833 Guilders. Today Schattenburg is a museum.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antonio Cilia (10 months ago)
Very important Museum to know the history of the city of Feldkirch and the Vorarberg land. To visit.
Mary-Anne Bellante (10 months ago)
My friend and I had an amazing time here! I dream about the castle beer every night! I looked up every possible way to get it, but you can only get it at the castle!
Kamil Baradziej (12 months ago)
Absolutely worth to visit. Only museum working hours are too short, in my opinion.
Gert Dekkers (19 months ago)
Very nice museum which beautifully reflects the history of the region. A lot to see for every age. The musuem presents it's content in many languages. The museum ends with an astonishing view of Feldkirch.
K G (2 years ago)
Overall - excellent. Obviously not as Grand as other castles, but worth the visit if it's a short trip. Amazing 570 year old clock along other artifacts. I took in everything slowly in 1.5 hours, a typical visit would be less than an hour unless you stay for dinner. The schnitzel was excellent s everyone says. Parking on site on Sunday was easy.
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