Schattenburg Castle

Feldkirch, Austria

Schattenburg castle was mentioned in the chronicle by the monks Ortlieb and Berthold in 1138. Muntifurt Castle, mentioned in the first half of the 12th century, may have housed vassals of the Earl of Bregenz, who ruled over the area at the time. At his coming to power (1182) the Earl Hugo I, the grandson of the last Earl of Bregenz Rudolf (1150), repositioned his residence to Feldkirch Castle, important for reasons of power politics and the control of traffic.

For 200 years, the Castle remained the property of the Earls of Montfort. Upon the death of the last of the Montforts, Rudolf IV (1390), the castle and the power that came with it passed to the Habsburgs. The Habsburgs ruled the estate through governors who lived in the Castle until 1773.

Only from 1416 until 1436 was their rule briefly interrupted, when it came into the hands of the Earls of Toggenburg. Duke Friedrich of Austria’s help in the flight of the antipope Johannes XIII turned out to be fatal for him. Not only was he outlawed in the name of the Emperor and excommunicated, he also lost all is possessions, among which Feldkirch. In 1825 the City bought the partially ruined Castle from the state for 833 Guilders. Today Schattenburg is a museum.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juliana Williams (2 years ago)
Amazing views and restaurant has amazing snitzel
John Demetriou (2 years ago)
A very nice and big collection of historic and religious artifacts. Taking a trip to the top of the castle will not only provide you with great artifacts but also a great view of the city from the top of castle.
Jose Lejin P J (2 years ago)
Museum is spectacular. Schattenburg is a castle and museum in Feldkirch, Austria. There is an on-site restaurant. The views of Feldkirch from this castle/museum are really nice. Castle is walkable from the town area. The collections of antique articles are excellent.
Anderson England (2 years ago)
A very nice collection of historic artifacts including religious items, furniture and weaponry all displayed in various rooms. A trip to the top of the tower really gave a fantastic view. There is a gift shop and a nice restaurant in the courtyard.
Acksios Kim (2 years ago)
Everything was Very nicely displayed. Very interesting information in German. You need to take a German friend. There is a lot of stairs. It is not accessible with pram or wheelchair. I would say older than 7 years old might enjoy. My 5 and 3 years old girl didn't really enjoyed it.
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