Vigala Church

Vigala, Estonia

The first mention of the church in Vigala dates back to 1339. It was built by Uexkülls, the oldest noble family of Livonia. The old church was a slate building with high gables. The choir was vaulted and a free-standing tower was erected in the 15th century. Due to the suboptimal loamy ground new towers had to be erected repeatedly.

The architect Alar Kotli designed the bell tower to commemorate those who have lost their lives in the battle of Vigala. The interior has many interesting artefacts. The Baroque pulpit and altar are made by C. Ackermann in 1670-1680. The granite figures of a soldier and a farmer on the supportive pillars of the tower were hidden in the ground during the Soviet era.·There is also a rare slate cross with mysterious symbols in the church in Vigala.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1339
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.visitestonia.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erika Poroson (3 years ago)
Very interesting church
muurten VR (4 years ago)
Alexander Antipenko (5 years ago)
Cool church. You can walk anywhere since all the doors and walkways are open and accessible to visitors. You can go up to the bell. I was very pleased. I love climbing on such structures.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wieskirche

The Pilgrimage Church of Wies (Wieskirche) is an oval rococo church, designed in the late 1740s by Dominikus Zimmermann. It is located in the foothills of the Alps in the municipality of Steingaden.

The sanctuary of Wies is a pilgrimage church extraordinarily well-preserved in the beautiful setting of an Alpine valley, and is a perfect masterpiece of Rococo art and creative genius, as well as an exceptional testimony to a civilization that has disappeared.

The hamlet of Wies, in 1738, is said to have been the setting of a miracle in which tears were seen on a simple wooden figure of Christ mounted on a column that was no longer venerated by the Premonstratensian monks of the Abbey. A wooden chapel constructed in the fields housed the miraculous statue for some time. However, pilgrims from Germany, Austria, Bohemia, and even Italy became so numerous that the Abbot of the Premonstratensians of Steingaden decided to construct a splendid sanctuary.