Carbisdale Castle was built in 1905-1917 for the Duchess of Sutherland on a hill across the Kyle of Sutherland. The castle has 365 windows, and the clock-tower only has clocks on three sides: the side facing Sutherland does not have a clock. There is a secret door below the Great Staircase which could be opened by rotating one of the statues. This mechanism is no longer in use. Until its closure, the castle had a large collection of art, with some pieces dating back to the year 1680, as well as the Italian marble statues.

Colonel Theodore Salvesen, a wealthy Scottish businessman of Norwegian extraction, bought the castle in 1933. He provided the castle as a safe refuge for King Haakon VII of Norway and Crown Prince Olav, who would later become King Olav V, during the Nazi occupation of Norway in World War II. During that time the castle was also used to hold important meetings. King Haakon VII made an agreement at the Carbisdale Conference on 22 June 1941, that the Russian forces, should they enter Norwegian territory, would not stay there after the war. Three years later, on 25 October 1944, the Red Army entered Norway and captured thirty towns, but later withdrew according to the terms of the agreement. After the Colonel died his son, Captain Harold Salvesen, inherited the castle and gave its contents and estate to the Scottish Youth Hostels Association. Carbisdale Castle Youth Hostel opened to members on 2 June 1945.

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Founded: 1905-1917
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Allan Mitchell (2 years ago)
The MTB trails are overgrown and poorly signposted. I wouldnt go again.
Pam Drury (2 years ago)
Walk difficult to find. No signs for walk or car parking. Not impressed.
Garry Elliott (2 years ago)
Well , here I am in Sydney in OZ TODAY marked 33 yrs , since I was there at Carbisdale Castle I spent 1 night there , only 2 people that night Everything was perfect It was adventure getting there from Inverness & getting away to Lochinver Hitchhiking all the way , including the railway bridge
simon schultz (2 years ago)
Been sold as a private Castle
Andres Revesz (3 years ago)
It was an excellent and pictoric youth hostel in a castle when i went on my motorcycle... Great grounds!
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