The Brusselpoort is the sole remaining city gate of the original twelve gates of the city of Mechelen. This imposing structure dates from the 13th century. Because of its exceptional height, towering above the other gates, it was also called the 'Overste poort' (superior gate). In the 16th century, the towers were lowered and the roof construction was altered to the present configuration. In the course of the centuries, the building had many different uses from police station to youth center, from duty collector's office to artist's workshop.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Tamás Révész (6 months ago)
As good as an airport can be, but as a smoker person I am very disappointed how smoking is treated after a check-in. I know I should not and it is in public interest to force back this habit, but if you do smoke you should get as much as you can before check-in, and than don't look for the smoking area - It's the worst I've ever seen.
Enki Zeli (7 months ago)
My fave place
wicked scarab (8 months ago)
A place to spend 10 minutes
Haresh R (8 months ago)
Nice place to visit
Ramunė Vaičiulytė (14 months ago)
One of the twelve till nowadays survived town gates and it really looks nice!
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