Rameyen Castle

Gestel, Belgium

The first known owner of Rameyen castle in Gestel was Jan II Berthout who lived in the castle in 1303. The oldest part of the castle is the square keep. This heavy tower dates back to the 13th century. The keep was fitted with cannon holes in the 16th century.

A beautiful castle was built around the keep by Van Immerseele and de Cock families. Boudewijn de Cock sold the castle in 1643 to Nicolaas Rubens, the second son of the famous painter Pieter Paul Rubens. The castle stayed as a property of the Rubens family until 1759. During the 17th century the castle underwent major restorations and remodelling but at the end of the same century the castle stood empty and decay started. The restoration took place in the 19th century when Esquire Nicolaas Joseph Alphonse de Cock came in possession of the castle. The Esquire lived in the castle until 1888. Other restorations took place in 1906. During WWI the castle was damaged but the restorations were already finished before the war ended. The last restorations took place in 1960. The castle is still property of the de Cock family. You can view the castle from the public road.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Belgium

More Information

www.belgiancastles.be

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

بشارة عمر (3 years ago)
Peter Matheus (4 years ago)
Kevin Hider (4 years ago)
Nice little spot for roadside lunch..
Robert De Peuter (4 years ago)
Geen openbare plaats.
Dmytro Stepanyuk (5 years ago)
Rustige plaats vriendelijk mensrn
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