Domus Romana

Rabat, Malta

The small museum of the Domus Romana is built around the remains of a rich, aristocratic roman town house (domus) which was accidentally discovered in 1881. Although very little remains from the house itself, the intricate mosaics which survived for centuries as well as the artefacts found within the remains are testimony enough of the original richness and story of this fantastic abode.

The building housing the remains of the domus was partly built immediately after the first excavation to protect the uncovered mosaics. Most of the Roman artefacts and antiquities, including the few remaining marble pieces scattered in the streets of Mdina were transferred to this museum, which was officially opened to the public in February 1882. Throughout the years the Museum continued to hold Roman material and it soon became an open storage space for all the Roman artefacts found around the Island.

The current Museum building does not only preserve some of the most precious Roman remains but also allows visitors to get a glimpse of life in a Roman domestic household. Apart from showing the complex history of the site, the current museum display is in fact designed to take the visitor through the various aspects of a Roman family and household with aspects ranging from the actual division of roles in a Roman family, to fashion, education, entertainment, food and drink.

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Address

Wesgha tal-Muzew, Rabat, Malta
See all sites in Rabat

Details

Founded: c. 75 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Malta

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Farrugia (3 months ago)
Recommended to see. Aplace you don't have to missedwhen you visit Malta.
Paulo Oliveira (4 months ago)
Nice historical place to visit. Right outside Mdina, it is a great first place to visit on a tour around historical Mdina. A good few shops and eating options around the area.
Jacob Wardamse (5 months ago)
It's an absolutely lovely Roman house with gorgeous mosaic floor- a really unexpected place to see. There were literally two other couples visiting it at the time we were there (mid Oct), which compared to crowds in the Mdina Old Town nearby was like entering an ancient Roman temple itself. The place gives you a historic background of the Roman Villa and the development of the city. There is a handful of original everyday items to be seen, as well as a handful of decorative pieces and few sculptures. The place is not very big, but worth to spend 5eur to visit it!
S G (5 months ago)
There is not a lot to see here buy we learned a lot speaking with the employee who seemed very interested in Malta's history. The old roman floor is interesting in its age, but if a handful of old household belongings aren't exciting to you it's probably not worth it.
tom waugh (11 months ago)
The finest example of a Roman residence in Mdina (Rabat). Well worth the four Euro entrance fee. For the history buff it provides a wonderful glimpse back in time to how the Roma nobility lived. Bright and spacious with beautiful mosaic flooring. Well worth a visit.They also have an outside balcony viewing area
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