Saluting Battery

Valletta, Malta

The Saluting Battery is Valletta's ancient ceremonial platform from where gun salutes are still fired regularly. Equally, the passage of time is marked twice daily from her with gun fire at noon (12:00) and sunset (16:00).

The battery itself is located at one of the capital's highest vantage points from where splendid vistas of the Grand Harbour and its surrounding towns can be enjoyed. Its origins go back to the time when Valletta was built by the Order of St. John in 1566. It remained in constant use, under the Knights, the French and the British in both its defensive and ceremonial roles for the next 400 years. This historic monument has recently been restored to all of its original functions as it stood in the late 19th century, complete with working cannon, artillery stores, gun powder magazine, historic ordnance collection and small museum.

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Founded: 1566
Category: Castles and fortifications in Malta

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Ciprian (9 months ago)
An interesting show.If you don't want to pay the entry fee you can stay in Upper Barrakka Gardens.You can see everything from there.
Lora Nielsen (10 months ago)
An interesting experience for the tourists. However, you might get surprised to be expected /asked to pay a donation after the saluting procedure is over. I find it to say the least inappropriate since this is part of their military procedures and even though it has become part of the local attractions is kinda bad to expect visitors to the garden to pay for the short saluting battery experience. If you have dogs or small kids that might not be the experience you are looking for.
Lora Nielsen (10 months ago)
An interesting experience for the tourists. However, you might get surprised to be expected /asked to pay a donation after the saluting procedure is over. I find it to say the least inappropriate since this is part of their military procedures and even though it has become part of the local attractions is kinda bad to expect visitors to the garden to pay for the short saluting battery experience. If you have dogs or small kids that might not be the experience you are looking for.
K S (10 months ago)
History buffs like me would enjoy this. They work hard to show you how it was during World Wars and earlier During the time of the Knights of Malta.
K S (10 months ago)
History buffs like me would enjoy this. They work hard to show you how it was during World Wars and earlier During the time of the Knights of Malta.
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