Deutsches Museum

Munich, Germany

The Deutsches Museum is the world's largest museum of science and technology, with approximately 1.5 million visitors per year and about 28,000 exhibited objects from 50 fields of science and technology.

The museum was founded on June 28, 1903, at a meeting of the Association of German Engineers as an initiative of Oskar von Miller. The main site of the Deutsches Museum is a small island in the Isar river, which had been used for rafting wood since the Middle Ages. The island did not have any buildings before 1772 because it was regularly flooded prior to the building of the Sylvensteinspeicher. In 1944, near the end of the war, the building was hit by numerous air strikes. More than 80% of the structure was destroyed.

This amazing attraction is the largest technological museum of its kind in the world and is renowned for its incredible historic artifacts, which mark important steps in the field of science and technology. Exhibits at the Deutsches Museum are many and varied and cover topics such as aerospace, astronomy, agriculture, computers, chemistry, electricity, marine navigation, mining, music, railways, and telecommunication.

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Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alan Czajkowski (5 months ago)
Amazing museum full of very interesting exhibits for all interests and all ages. The interactive room at the end of the tour let's you build your own going away gift, we got to solder our own circuit board in the shape and design of the museum logo, the owl ?, which was such an amazing experience to put together your own circuit board with a soldering gun, and it actually works and lights up! Highly recommended for everybody.
James Saunders (10 months ago)
Mining is amazing but not for the unfit Shipping is good. Machines were great. Toys were small but amazing I was disappointed on flight. For a country with a history of aviation they could have done so much better Great Museum. Cheap for what you get Warning if you do not read German the English signage is limited. But better than German signs in any British Museum I loved my visit
Jonathan Fraine (14 months ago)
Amazing!! I was so excited. And my kids were so so happy to see everything. They would not stop saying "wow. Look at this. And this and this." This is the best place to bring kids and happy adults for several repeat trips
Albert Ziegler (16 months ago)
Technical museum with deep dives into different areas. There's many more than can be explored in one visit, so it's useful to focus on one or two that strike your fancy. My personal favourite is The Mine. Suitable for adults and children alike (though not all parts are equally interesting to younger age groups).
Ana Mak (16 months ago)
It's a great museum especially with physics and computer science department! I loved ships area but there is a better museum for this topic in Hamburg. I really enjoyed my day there. Note that you will require at least 5-6hours to go trough and see everything but not paying attention to all details.:)
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