Deutsches Museum

Munich, Germany

The Deutsches Museum is the world's largest museum of science and technology, with approximately 1.5 million visitors per year and about 28,000 exhibited objects from 50 fields of science and technology.

The museum was founded on June 28, 1903, at a meeting of the Association of German Engineers as an initiative of Oskar von Miller. The main site of the Deutsches Museum is a small island in the Isar river, which had been used for rafting wood since the Middle Ages. The island did not have any buildings before 1772 because it was regularly flooded prior to the building of the Sylvensteinspeicher. In 1944, near the end of the war, the building was hit by numerous air strikes. More than 80% of the structure was destroyed.

This amazing attraction is the largest technological museum of its kind in the world and is renowned for its incredible historic artifacts, which mark important steps in the field of science and technology. Exhibits at the Deutsches Museum are many and varied and cover topics such as aerospace, astronomy, agriculture, computers, chemistry, electricity, marine navigation, mining, music, railways, and telecommunication.

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Address

Zenneckbrücke, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 1903
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giorgio Manzi (7 months ago)
Massive place. Easily will take a full day. Download app for fun time. Regular admission costly but great for students. I would also recommend downloading translating by photo app on your phone as lot of the descriptions are in Germany. Regardless highly interactive and would definitely go back as museum always developing.
Tomás Rasga (8 months ago)
Wonderful experience! Rich and overwhelming bursts of culture throughout the rooms
Cristina Dobos (9 months ago)
This museum must have been a huge achievement 30 years ago. Unfortunately it really doesn’t keep up with the times, which is ironical for a technology museum. The entry costs 14E which can be explained only by the space covered but not the entertaining or easiness to navigate factor. Much of the info is outdated and is presented like in a school book (no video, no way to connect to the visitors), everything in German only almost
Tomas Žvinys (9 months ago)
Wonderful big museum. Pretty interactive and has a canteen inside. Good place for whole family, I believe. I'm sure everyone will find something interesting. Most of the exhibits have translations in English (mining industry is a bit of an exception unfortunately). On the other hand - the mining industry part is probably the most amazing and unique.
Peter Gibbs (11 months ago)
The size of the museum and the number of exhibits really make this place shine. You can easily spend 5+ hours here being moderately thorough and still have plenty to see for a return visit. The building itself is quite elegant, and is located on an Island with scenic river views on both sides. Many of the older exhibits are in German only, but most have English translations. There is plenty to see for adults, and plenty of run-around interactive science exhibits for kids. Interactive exhibits are clearly marked on the map, allowing for easier planning for parents.
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