Berchtesgaden Castle

Berchtesgaden, Germany

Berchtesgaden Castle dates from 1102 from the Augustin Collegiate. According to legend, Countess Irmgard von Sulzbach vowed to found the monastery as gratitude for saving her spouse after a serious hunting accident.

Throughout the ages, provosts and canons expanded the complex of buildings. Seen from today, it is a lucky circumstance that never enough money was available for tearing the place down. On the contrary, extensions have always been added in the style of the time. The Romanesque cloister has been built around 1180, followed around 1400 by the two-nave Gothic hall. Around 1500 two Renaissance halls were built on the southern side and the Baroque wing was added in 1725.

During the 14th century, the Augustin collegiate achieved imperial immediacy, which made it direct subordinate to the emperor. The provost became the territorial lord and the monastery premises became his residence. In 1559, the monastery was raised to the status of provostry.

After mediatisation (meaning lifting of the spiritual status) in 1803 and the concomitant end of provostal rule, the Land of Berchtesgaden came for short periods under different rules until, in 1810, it became part of the Kingdom of Bavaria. Since 1818, Berchtesgaden Castle has been used as hunting lodge by the kings of Bavaria. Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria made it his residence and lived in it with his family from 1922 until 1933. The rich furnishing of the castle with works of art is due to him. To these days, the head of the House of Wittelsbach, Duke Franz of Bavaria, uses the castle as summer residence.

Many different style eras have set their stamp on Berchtesgaden Royal Castle: from Romanesque to Gothic and Baroque, right on to Rococo. Throughout the ages, at has been expanded and modified again and again. The cloister and its late Romanesque sculptures are evidence of the castle’s origins in the High Middle Ages. After 1818, the erstwhile monastery was used by the Wittelsbachs as hunting lodge. Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria (1869-1955) lived here with his family from 1922 until 1933 and used many rooms for exhibiting items from the art collection of the Wittelsbachs. They include two retables by Tilman Riemenschneider of Rothenburg ob der Tauber and also valuable hunting weapons and trophies as well as, at 18 kilogrammes, the heaviest antlers of Bavaria. Precious furniture, exquisite porcelain and paintings by major artists, especially from the 'Munich School', make it all complete. The view from the Upper Rode Garden over the Watzmann is considered to be the most splendid in the entire valley.

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Details

Founded: 1102
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.schloss-berchtesgaden.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Josh Beaty (13 months ago)
A beautifully restored building, if you want to learn about the pre-Nazi history of Berchtesgaden this is the place to go. A tour is highly recommended.
babar khan (13 months ago)
During Christmas time, i visited there. The Christmas market and palace looked beautiful.
Pablo OGF (2 years ago)
Wonderfull!!! the guided tour was almost private, we were just 5 people there.
Craig Weis (2 years ago)
My cousin took me here for a walk, what a beautiful, historic and picturesque place. We spent several hours walking and sightseeing. Could have spent even longer but were meeting our spouses for supper.
Peter Hughes (2 years ago)
Very interesting place to visit, lots of history.Cenrally based and the walk to it is beautiful
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