The Kehlsteinhaus (known as the Eagle's Nest in English-speaking countries) is a Third Reich-era edifice erected atop the summit of the Kehlstein, a rocky outcrop that rises near the town of Berchtesgaden. It was presented to Adolf Hitler on his 50th birthday as a retreat and place to entertain friends and visiting dignitaries. Today it is open seasonally as a restaurant, beer garden, and tourist site.

The Kehlsteinhaus was commissioned by Martin Bormann in the summer of 1937 as a 50th birthday gift for Adolf Hitler. Paid for by the Nazi Party, it was completed in 13 months but held until a formal presentation in 1939. From a large car park a 124m entry tunnel leads to an ornate elevator which ascends the final 124m to the building. Its car is surfaced with polished brass, Venetian mirrors and green leather. Construction of the entire project cost the lives of 12 workers. The building's main reception room is dominated by a fireplace of red Italian marble presented by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, which was damaged by Allied soldiers chipping off pieces to take home as souvenirs. Much of the furniture was designed by Paul László.

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Founded: 1937
Category:
Historical period: Nazi Germany (Germany)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Bonetti (19 months ago)
Beautiful views and worth seeing once, but somewhat anticlimactic. The building itself is empty except for the restaurant and there’s little interpretative information available. So visit, enjoy, but have reasonable expectations.
Hansei Kai (19 months ago)
Impressive entrance (the tunnel and the elevator) however, once you are up there, there is no much to see, If you saw Band of Brothers you can feel this visit different but if you go there to look for Hitler's history or something like that you will get disappointed. Beautiful view from there though.
Josh Beaty (20 months ago)
A remarkable place to visit, once you reach the top the view is breathtaking. Learning about the history of the Eagle's nest was fascinating, the engineering and hard work by the labourers was inspiring but somewhat perplexing given the harsh conditions and short time frame imposed upon them. A must visit when you are in the area!
Anthony Greco (20 months ago)
I last visited the Eagles Nest in 1979. There was the tearoom, but not the cafe. This attraction is spell binding. From the time you enter the elevator (shiny brass) and take the brief ride to the top was awesome, this "tea house" was a gift to Hitler for his birthday. I recall our guide saying that he only was there a handful of times It's good that it wasn't demolished by the German government, most of the other sights like Hitler's House, The SS barracks were taken down as they would be in the minds of some sickoo visitors a memorial to the regime that cost millions of innocent lives. This is a MUST see.
Maija Klints (20 months ago)
An awesome place to visit. It’s neat to be on top of the mountain. But from the side outlook, the surrounding mountains are immense. Breathtakingly beautiful. Would return in a heartbeat ❤️
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