The Kehlsteinhaus (known as the Eagle's Nest in English-speaking countries) is a Third Reich-era edifice erected atop the summit of the Kehlstein, a rocky outcrop that rises near the town of Berchtesgaden. It was presented to Adolf Hitler on his 50th birthday as a retreat and place to entertain friends and visiting dignitaries. Today it is open seasonally as a restaurant, beer garden, and tourist site.

The Kehlsteinhaus was commissioned by Martin Bormann in the summer of 1937 as a 50th birthday gift for Adolf Hitler. Paid for by the Nazi Party, it was completed in 13 months but held until a formal presentation in 1939. From a large car park a 124m entry tunnel leads to an ornate elevator which ascends the final 124m to the building. Its car is surfaced with polished brass, Venetian mirrors and green leather. Construction of the entire project cost the lives of 12 workers. The building's main reception room is dominated by a fireplace of red Italian marble presented by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, which was damaged by Allied soldiers chipping off pieces to take home as souvenirs. Much of the furniture was designed by Paul László.

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Founded: 1937
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Germany
Historical period: Nazi Germany (Germany)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stein Jarle Andersen (2 years ago)
Spectacular view, hope for a clear Day!
Giulio Aprin (2 years ago)
Best view best location. Perfect for couples or singles who are looking for total peace and relax. Isolation and meditation
Jose Cuayo (3 years ago)
This place is truly amazing. Check their schedule to see when they are open. As you can imagine snow fall in the winter might not make it possible to get to the top
Gabriella Popovich (3 years ago)
Fascinating place. Definitely worth to visit. For those, who are not very fit, when getting there, it's better to take the bus and later the elevator. Great view.
Linda Mechsner (3 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful scenery, restaurant was closed when we were there but would be beautiful to go to. Getting up through the mountain and seeing the construction that was done 80+ years ago is almost as awe inspiring as the view once you reach the top. Well worth the visit.
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