Museum im Kulturspeicher Würzburg

Würzburg, Germany

The Museum im Kulturspeicher Würzburg is a municipal art museum opened in 2002 within a converted river-side warehouse that provides 3,500 m² of exhibit space in 12 rooms. It contains two distinct collections: the municipal art collection, founded in 1941 as the Städtische Gallerie and originally located in Hofstraße; and the Peter C. Ruppert Collection of European concrete art from World War II to the present day.

The municipal collection exhibits regional art, primarily from Franconia and Southern Germany, ranging from Biedermeier-style portraits and landscapes of the first half of the 19th century, through German impressionism and painters of the Berlin Secession, including Robert Breyer, Philipp Franck, Walter Leistikow, Joseph Oppenheimer, and Max Slevogt, as well as members of the Weimar Saxon-Grand Ducal Art School including Ludwig von Gleichen-Rußwurm and Franz Bunke. It also includes works by Bauhaus painter Hans Reichel and works from the estate of sculptor Emy Roeder, as well as about 30,000 graphics works.

The Ruppert collection includes concrete art from 22 European countries, incorporating a broad spectrum of materials and media, exhibited within six galleries. Artists include Max Bill, John Carter, Andreas Christen, Ralph Eck, Christoph Freimann, Gerhard von Graevenitz, Erwin Heerich, Malcolm Hughes, Norbert Kricke, Richard Paul Lohse, Maurizio Nannucci, Nausika Pastra, Henry Prosi, Bridget Riley, Peter Sedgley, and Anton Stankowski.

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Details

Founded: 2002
Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kai Warmus (20 months ago)
Ein wirklich gutes Kunstmuseum, welches darüber hinaus in einem sehr sehenswerten, denkmalgeschützten Hafenspeicher beherbergt ist und über eine tolle Sammlung verfügt. Vorab ... Das Ganze ist uneingeschränkt zu empfehlen. Geboten wird Kunst vom 19. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart, auf sehr großen, freien, offenen Ausstellungsflächen. In einem Trakt befindet sich die Städtische Sammlung mit Kunst vom 19. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart. In einem zweiten Trakt die „Sammlung Peter C. Ruppert. Konkrete Kunst in Europa nach 1945“. Hier findet man Kunstwerke aus 23 verschiedenen Ländern. In einem 3. Trakt befinden sich wechselnde Sonderausstellungen. Der Zugang und Wechsel zu und zwischen allen Trakten ist jederzeit möglich.
Alexander Fürst (21 months ago)
Magnificent Exhibitions, free on every first Sunday of the month.
Gerhard Wasilewski (2 years ago)
Tolle Location mit überraschend vielen Objekten. Sehenswert!
Олег Владимирович Максименко (2 years ago)
Отличное место! Прекрасная коллекция конкретного искусства из собрания Петера Рупперта, представленная в шести выставочных залах общей площадью 1850 кв.м. Коллекция включает произведения, созданные с конца Второй мировой войны до наших дней. Рекомендую посмотреть!
Almer Begovic (2 years ago)
Nice place for visit
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