Braunau in Rohr Abbey is a monastery of the Augustinian Canons dedicated to the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It was founded in 1133 by Adalbert of Rohr. It was dissolved in the secularization of 1803 when the German princes substituted church lands for property they had lost through Napoleon. In the east wing the parish priest's offices and a school were accommodated, and in a part of the west wing, an inn. The remaining buildings were demolished.

The abbey church, dedicated, like the abbey, to the Assumption, contains a high altar, which represents the Assumption of the Virgin in fully three-dimensional sculpture a Theatrum sacrum. It was created by Egid Quirin Asam in 1722 and 1723.

After World War II the exiled German Benedictine monks from Braunau Abbey (Braunau is now Broumov in the Czech Republic) were lodged here in part of the east wing. They gradually re-established their community, acquiring little by little the remaining parts of the entire monastery complex. The monks have re-established a secondary school here.

The abbey has been part of the Bavarian Congregation of the Benedictine Confederation since 1984.

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Details

Founded: 1133
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

brocki hd (21 months ago)
Sehr schön und alle sehr nett ,coole Schule
Matthias Richter (21 months ago)
Gute Herberge
Chris Grumbine (2 years ago)
Unexpectedly wonderful. Very friendly staff. Beautiful active church designed in the baroque style.
Gérard Coustes (2 years ago)
Un théâtre surnaturel plein de mouvement et de somptuosite
Leonhard Moritz (2 years ago)
Es ist sicher kein Zufall, daß der Stil der Auschmückung mich an die (Kloster) Kirche von Ebersberg erinnert. Sehr viele interessante Parallelen in den Stuckdetails. Absolut sehenswert.
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