St. Stephan's Church

Bamberg, Germany

St. Stephan's Church is built on the most eastern of the seven hills. It has been Bamberg's most important protestant church since 1807.

The original building, which was probably donated by empress Kunigunde, was erected at the same time as Heinrich's Cathedral and was consecrated by Pope Benedict VIII in 1020. Today's church was constructed in two phases in the 17th century and is based on a Greek cross. The choir, built by Giovanni Bonalino in 1628/29, includes elements of the baroque, neo-gothic style. The three other naves, for which Antonio Petrini was responsible, reflect a baroque style, strongly influenced by the renaissance. The works of art span the baroque period to the present day.

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Details

Founded: 1628
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.bamberg.info

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吳延川 (2 years ago)
十字形平面教堂
Julio Leal (2 years ago)
Margaux Lassauniere (2 years ago)
Yvonne Guenther (2 years ago)
Jürgen Kehne (4 years ago)
Ich wurde in Sankt Stephan konfiertmit und hatte bis heute keine Einladung zu irgendwelchen Begegnungen. Ich habe ein Konfirmationbild mit meinen Konfirmanden. Warum ,ich bin Jahrgang 1943, kam nie eine Nachricht. Ich habe in meiner Dokumentenakte mein Heiliges Kreuz und auch meinen Konfirmationspruch.
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