St. Martin's Church

Bamberg, Germany

St. Martin's Church is located in the heart of Bamberg. Built by the Dietzenhofer brothers, it is Bamberg's only baroque church.

The creation of this church is closely linked with the Jesuits as it was originally constructed as the university church and the church of the Jesuit College. After a construction period of just seven years, the house of worship was consecrated in 1693. The trompe d'oeil dome by Giovanni Francesco Marchini and the early 14th century pieta are well worth seeing.

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Details

Founded: 1693
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.bamberg.info

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Дима Харитончик (2 months ago)
Очень красивый действующий костел. Все очень величественно, в жилом районе старого города. Перед входом расположен небольшой фруктового-овощной рыночек и цветочная лавка.
Andreas Wünsche (3 months ago)
Spektakuläre Weihnachtsbäme und eine Historische Krippe besonders sehenswert. Auch außerhalb der Weihnachtszeit besuchenswert. Konzertprogramm beachten. Natürlich auch katholische Gottesdienste auch unter der Woche.
Theo Ö (3 months ago)
Schöne Kirche
Claus Rehder (4 months ago)
Schöner Ort
wannee panitphong (12 months ago)
The inside is splendid
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