Parsberg Castle

Parsberg, Germany

The Parsberg Castle was first documented in 1205. The first castle was destructed in 1314 by Duke Ludwig of Bavaria due supporting the rebellion. The castle was rebuilt and extended in the end of the 16th century. The next reconstruction took place in the mid-17th century, probably due the damages in Thirty Years' War. The lower castle was added then, where today is a castle museum.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.burg-parsberg.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reinhard Ibins (16 months ago)
gutes kleines museum,mit vielen regionalen gegenständen. Tipp unbedingt die paar euros für den audio-guide investieren!der ist sehr gut gemacht und mega informativ.
Jens H. (18 months ago)
Anruf genügt und es wird einem Einlass gewährt das ist wohl ein einzigartiger Service in der heutigen Zeit. Wunderschöne Anlage mit einem super Museum welchem man die tatsächliche Größe gar nicht ansieht. Da hat sich Anfahrt und Besuch auf jeden Fall gelohnt. Macht weiter so, ich komme auf jeden Fall wieder. P.S. Der Eintrittspreis ist unschlagbar!
CJR 1106 (2 years ago)
Just next to a Xmas markets sells some trinkets really homely
Julie Kent (2 years ago)
Easy fun visit
Julius Griffin (3 years ago)
All i can say is meh. To each their own.
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