St. Bartholomew Church

Berchtesgaden, Germany

St. Bartholomew is a Catholic pilgrimage church in the Berchtesgadener Land. It named for Saint Bartholomew the Apostle, patron of alpine farmers and dairymen. The church is located at the western shore of the Königssee lake, on the Hirschau peninsula. It can only be reached by ship or after a long hike across the surrounding mountains.

The Palace and pilgrimage church were founded by the Prince-Provosts of Berchtesgaden in 1134. From 1697 onwards it has been rebuilt in a Baroque style with a floor plan modelled on Salzburg Cathedral, two onion domes and a red domed roof. The church features stucco work by the Salzburg master Joseph Schmidt and a three-apse quire.

After Berchtesgaden became part of Bavaria in 1810, the palace became a hunting lodge for the Bavarian kings and was one of their favourite haunts. Since the Romantic period, the world-famous pilgrimage church, set against the Watzmann range, has been a source of inspiration for numerous landscape painters.

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Berchtesgaden, Germany
See all sites in Berchtesgaden

Details

Founded: 1697
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

www.bavaria.by

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kyle Patel (11 months ago)
Beautiful location whole things takes 15 minutes to explore unless you are hiking elsewhere from here
satya sashanka (2 years ago)
If you want to escape into nature, this is one place that can be added to the list . Konigsee is a good hangout place
TH3 TR/\V1R (2 years ago)
Beautiful old church from the 12th century. The outside with the mountains in the background is gorgeous, inside it's quite simple.
Abubakar Hameed (2 years ago)
This beautiful church is located at the corner of the konigsee lake. You can take the boat from konigsee docker station for which you have to register for the tickets atleast a day before. Otherwise you would face a long queue at the station. The boat tour till obersee is recommended, you can stop at St.bartholomew's church. The speciality of this place is the scenic beauty and the fresh trout fish served at the restaurant. Totally worth it!
Jan Clierinck (2 years ago)
Lovely views from the boat but did not get off in order to avoid yet another long waiting line to get back on a boat. Good if you leave early in the mornng and can enjoy the surroundings. There was also a new construction and crane working at time of this posting. Hard to make nice pictures now!!
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