St. Bartholomew Church

Berchtesgaden, Germany

St. Bartholomew is a Catholic pilgrimage church in the Berchtesgadener Land. It named for Saint Bartholomew the Apostle, patron of alpine farmers and dairymen. The church is located at the western shore of the Königssee lake, on the Hirschau peninsula. It can only be reached by ship or after a long hike across the surrounding mountains.

The Palace and pilgrimage church were founded by the Prince-Provosts of Berchtesgaden in 1134. From 1697 onwards it has been rebuilt in a Baroque style with a floor plan modelled on Salzburg Cathedral, two onion domes and a red domed roof. The church features stucco work by the Salzburg master Joseph Schmidt and a three-apse quire.

After Berchtesgaden became part of Bavaria in 1810, the palace became a hunting lodge for the Bavarian kings and was one of their favourite haunts. Since the Romantic period, the world-famous pilgrimage church, set against the Watzmann range, has been a source of inspiration for numerous landscape painters.

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Berchtesgaden, Germany
See all sites in Berchtesgaden

Details

Founded: 1697
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

www.bavaria.by

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jiří Smutný (18 months ago)
One of the most beautiful places I have ever been to. Only way to get there is by a boat or walk across the mountains and the nature is incredible. Water in the Kenigsee lake is astonishingly pure. Only downside here are the people. I suggest to take the first ship early in the morning and be there first. Just like we did.
Alice Pető (19 months ago)
Peaceful, loveley small Island with a great restaurant.
Elmeret Roets (19 months ago)
An amazing experience!! An if you miss the boat... Have another beer!
Mahesh M (2 years ago)
Restaurant with tasty local Fish Menu and the breath taking view of the lake and mountain
Mehul Chopra (2 years ago)
Mesmerizing place to visit for sure in your lifetime. One of the oldest electric boat in Germany.... Nice place to track .... Fall, summer and winter snow has it's own beauty for this place.
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