The Petersfriedhof or St. Peter's Cemetery is - together with the burial site at Nonnberg Abbey - the oldest cemetery in Salzburg. It is one of Salzburg's most popular tourist attractions. Its origins date back to about 700, when the adjacent St. Peter's Abbey was established by Saint Rupert of Salzburg. The abbey's cemetery, probably at the site of an even earlier burial place, was first mentioned in an 1139 deed, the oldest tombstone dates to 1288. Closed in 1878, the site decayed until in 1930 the monks of St. Peter's successfully urged for the admission of new burials.

Carved into the rock of the Festungsberg there are catacombs that may stem from the Early Christian days of Severinus of Noricum during the Migration Period. They include two chapels: The Maximuskapelle and the Gertraudenkapelle, consecrated in 1178 under the Salzburg Archbishop Conrad of Wittelsbach and dedicated to the assassinated Archbishop Thomas Becket of Canterbury.

A second chapel, The Margarethenkapelle, (re-)built in 1491, occupies a cite in the center of the cemetery.

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Founded: 700 AD
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Austria

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sadine Schmietendorf (18 months ago)
This cemetery looks more like a garden. There are also a must see catacombs (+ 2.00 EUR). Amazing place.
Ivan Radnev (2 years ago)
Although it sounds strange, the cemetery of the monastery is among the top landmarks of Salzburg. So there you will meet many tourists. In the cemetery are buried the most prominent figures of Salzburg. There you will see order and greenery. As well as small mausoleums with impressive architectural style.
Callum Kerr (2 years ago)
Incredibly old cemetery that has great views of the castle and cathedral near by. The chapel was built in 1491 and appears to remain in great condition
monica pronzini (2 years ago)
There are cemeteries that are like gardens, and this is one, although small. The atmosphere, the colours and the two old churches make it a special place. The tombs are ancient. Worth a visit, including the nearby small catacombs.
Piotrek Szostak (2 years ago)
It’s still a bit weird to me to assume a graveyard can be a tourist attraction - even after I went there as a tourist myself, but I have to admit I’m glad I did - there is no entry fee, the place is actually pretty small but it holds an incredible amount of history. There is also a catacomb (2€ fee) that is surprisingly the through the stairs up rather than down and is carved into the mountain rock. Very interesting
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