Mozart's Birthplace

Salzburg, Austria

Salzburg’s Wunderkind – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – was born in what is known as the Hagenauer House at no. 9 Getreidegasse on the 27th January 1756. He lived there with his sister Nannerl and his parents until 1773. Mozart’s Geburtshaus now houses a museum open all year round.

Mozart’s Geburtshaus guides guests through the original rooms in which the Mozart family lived and presents a range of artefacts, including historical instruments, documents, keepsakes and mementos, and the majority of the portraits painted during his lifetime. One such example is the unfinished oil portrait painted by Mozart’s brother-in-law Joseph Lange in 1789 – ‘Wolfgang Amade Mozart at the piano’. Among the most famous exhibits are Mozart’s childhood violin, his clavichord, portraits and letters belonging to the Mozart family.

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Details

Founded: 1756
Category: Museums in Austria

More Information

www.salzburg.info

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tasneem Badwahwala (8 months ago)
Salzburg old town is beautiful with right mix of old and new.. Roamed around, did window shopping, went to the castle, the love Bridge and more.. The snow made things much more charming
Ugo (8 months ago)
I love history. I love culture, as then no comparisons come into the picture. Every aspect is its own entity to be appreciated in itself. Expectations are limited to the particular item of interest. It's only expected then that I'll fawn over being at this place.
Jesse Wang (9 months ago)
I love classic music, but I really don't know what's the interests of this place. There are two antique piano with much less and smaller keys. But nothing else let me get ideas of what it looks like when the great was born, nor the environment he grew up. That's what I most interested.
Sadine Schmietendorf (9 months ago)
Interesting information on Mozart and his family. Should have his music in all the rooms. And even decorate the living and bedroom to the time period. The kitchen is a good start. The models to Mozart operas are great
Patrick Suhner (10 months ago)
Very interesting museum, but also very crowded (according to the reputation of the composer in his hometown) and small ; therefore you cannot visit very quietly. Architecture of the house is typical and you can feel History through the walls. Family ticket at EUR 23.- for 2 adults and 2 young kids is a good deal (as usual in Germany or Austria).
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