Heimhof Castle was built in the 14th century by the lords of Haimenhofen and is a well-preserved example of a medieval castle residence. It consists of a three storey building with corner towers.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

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burgenseite.de

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3.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gabriel Feigenbaum (17 months ago)
Actually only wanted to turn around in the parking lot because someone has already complained that it was a private parking lot. There are hobbies. Then please also mark it. I looked again and there was a tiny label on the edge. After all, didn't want to turn around in front of the castle. Would have been more appropriate. For those interested in the castle: Looked closed. So better inform in advance.
Gabriel Rosenstein (17 months ago)
Actually only wanted to turn around in the parking lot because someone has already complained that it was a private parking lot. There are hobbies. Then please also mark it. I looked again and there was a tiny label on the edge. After all, didn't want to turn around in front of the castle. Would have been more appropriate. For those interested in the castle: Looked closed. So better inform in advance.
Elke Berger (2 years ago)
You can only see it from the outside, it's privately owned
Tabitha Stephani (2 years ago)
Nice castle. Unfortunately privately owned. Rude host. Wanted to park with our car and dog in the gravel parking lot behind to go for a walk and were unfriendly sent away. If it's private (we had overlooked the sign, who also thinks that a castle belongs to a private person), that's not a problem in itself, but you can also express your concerns in a friendly manner.
Tina S (Tara YLuna) (2 years ago)
Looks interesting from outside, but it is privately owned so you will not be able to see the inside.
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