In 1956, the discovery of a Roman countryside villa was unearthed alongside the road to Weiler Kreut, parallel to what is now the B17 neu federal highway. This existed from the beginning of the 2nd century until the middle of the 4th century AD. The site is part of a group of large villas belonging to the former province of Raetia. It is situated on the junction of the former Roman Kaiserstaße Via Claudia Augusta, which runs on the opposite side of the Lech river, and the connecting road to the Brenner.

The Villa Rustica of Peiting is one of Germany’s rare atrium buildings, which instead of the usual corners risalits, features two apsides. Hypocaust heating systems in the main building and bath house, remains of mural paintings, glass windows and terra sigillata discoveries provide evidence of the building’s high standard of living.

Besides the rarity of the type of building, a small inscribed plumb panel was found on both sides, bricked into the foundation walls. The panel displays what is presumed to be a spell of love, which a certain clement had written and addressed to a woman by the name of Gemella. A find like no other to date, which still to this day has not been fully decrypted.

The remains of the bath house, which were exposed again between 2000 and 2004, can be found under a fully glazed protective enclosure. Information boards explain the construction. A Roman culinary and medicinal herb teaching garden surrounds the enclosure.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

B17, Peiting, Germany
See all sites in Peiting

Details

Founded: 100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Germany
Historical period: Germanic Tribes (Germany)

More Information

www.peiting.de

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andreas D. (13 months ago)
Well-kept, covered archaeological site. The excavations are clearly visible through all-round glazing of the building. Display boards and a garden with herbs in the area complete the site as a teaching facility. Free of charge (a donation box is set up) with parking spaces in front of the house.
Kelly van Lieshout (14 months ago)
Very nice looking bathing house. The old villa’s are still beneath the grass though. Very impressive to see. Unfortunately, I do not understand much of what I”m actually seeing as it is only in German. Which is quite strange, considering it a suggested attraction on the Romantic Road, visited by many Americans and Asians as well, and sponsored by the EU. There’s a whole lot of story being told in German and I really like to know the story behind what I’m seeing
Alfred Platschka (15 months ago)
Descriptive representation of an ancient Roman manor. Plastic representation of the found objects of tools, everyday objects, as well as presentation of an extensive herb garden of the Roman kitchen. Although not permanently staffed with management personnel as a museum, the all-round glazing of the exhibition pavilion gives the visitor an understandable overview of the former spa baths of the business complex, as well as the remains of the wall as well as the image / text. A visit in transit is definitely recommended.
Andreas Stock (19 months ago)
Lovingly prepared Roman excavation with very well explanatory representations in a beautiful setting .... Interesting!
Guenter Uhlig (2 years ago)
Sehr schön restauriertes römisches Badehaus.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kraków Cloth Hall

The Cloth Hall in Kraków dates to the Renaissance and is one of the city's most recognizable icons. It is the central feature of the main market square in the Kraków Old Town (listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1978).

The hall was once a major centre of international trade. Traveling merchants met there to discuss business and to barter. During its golden age in the 15th century, the hall was the source of a variety of exotic imports from the east – spices, silk, leather and wax – while Kraków itself exported textiles, lead, and salt from the Wieliczka Salt Mine.

Kraków was Poland's capital city and was among the largest cities in Europe already from before the time of the Renaissance. However, its decline started with the move of the capital to Warsaw in the very end of the 16th century. The city's decline was hastened by wars and politics leading to the Partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century. By the time of the architectural restoration proposed for the cloth hall in 1870 under Austrian rule, much of the historic city center was decrepit. A change in political and economic fortunes for the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria ushered in a revival due to newly established Legislative Assembly or Sejm of the Land. The successful renovation of the Cloth Hall, based on design by Tomasz Pryliński and supervised by Mayor Mikołaj Zyblikiewicz, Sejm Marshal, was one of the most notable achievements of this period.

The hall has hosted many distinguished guests over the centuries and is still used to entertain monarchs and dignitaries, such as Charles, Prince of Wales and Emperor Akihito of Japan, who was welcomed here in 2002. In the past, balls were held here, most notably after Prince Józef Poniatowski had briefly liberated the city from the Austrians in 1809. Aside from its history and cultural value, the hall still is still used as a center of commerce.

On the upper floor of the hall is the Sukiennice Museum division of the National Museum, Kraków. It holds the largest permanent exhibit of the 19th-century Polish painting and sculpture, in four grand exhibition halls arranged by historical period and the theme extending into an entire artistic epoch. The museum was upgraded in 2010 with new technical equipment, storerooms, service spaces as well as improved thematic layout for the display.

The Gallery of 19th-Century Polish Art was a major cultural venue from the moment it opened on October 7, 1879. It features late Baroque, Rococo, and Classicist 18th-century portraits and battle scenes by Polish and foreign pre-Romantics.