The Schepenhuis (Aldermen's House) of Aalst is a former city hall, one of the oldest in the Low Countries. Dating originally from 1225, it was partially rebuilt twice as a result of fire damage, first after a 1380 war and again after a fireworks accident in 1879.

The belfry tower at one corner of the building was completed in 1460, and in the next year was equipped with a carillon built by master craftsmen from Mechelen. The current carillon, the sixth installed since the original, has 52 bells. Inscribed on the tower are the Latin words nec spe, nec metu ('not with hope, not with fear'). This was the motto of Spain's Philip II, whose domain expanded into the Low Countries in 1555.

A small wing of late Gothic style, facing the market square and adorned with five life-size statues, was added in the 16th century. From this annex one can access the cellars, which originally served as torture chambers.

The schepenhuis with its belfry is one of an ensemble of related buildings that together have received UNESCO World Heritage status.

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Kattestraat 2-24, Aalst, Belgium
See all sites in Aalst

Details

Founded: 1225
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Belgium

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Karol Litkowski (2 years ago)
Warte zwiedzania jak siÄ™ jest przy okazji
Ioan Ardean (3 years ago)
Locatie superba
Samuli Rantanen (3 years ago)
A beautiful historical building.
Joris Lambrecht (3 years ago)
Geen gids nodig om deze "gralijk"mooie toren te bewonderen, elk kwartuurtje geeft deze een vrolijk deuntje om de Aalsterse Grote Markt op te fleuren
Ivaylo Minchev (4 years ago)
Loveli city! :)
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