Church of Our Lady

Dendermonde, Belgium

The Church of our Holy Lady, a fine example of Scheldt gothic, houses a number of important art objects: paintings by Antony Van Dyck and Gaspard De Craeyer among others, a skilfully sculptured pulpit, a marble high altar and several worthwhile mural paintings.

The showpiece is a romanesque baptismal font in blue stone of Tournai (11th century).

The original romanesque church was replaced by a gothic one in the shape of a Latin cross in the 13th century. During the following centuries, new elements were added to the building. A wooden spire, constructed in 1911, was blown down during a storm in 1940 and never replaced.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

More Information

www.toerismedendermonde.be

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dimitry Z. (2 years ago)
Very good
Christian Mestdagh (2 years ago)
A Church to be proud of, both religiously and artistically.
B S (2 years ago)
Very nice walk in Dendermonde
Simo (3 years ago)
Very beautiful church!
Tinne Munten (3 years ago)
Worth a visit, a church full of art treasures!
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