The Pombaline Lower Town (called usually as Baixa) area covers about 235,620 square metres of central Lisbon. It is an elegant district, primarily constructed after the 1755 Lisbon earthquake. It takes its name from Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, the Prime Minister to Joseph I of Portugal from 1750 to 1777 and key figure of the Enlightenment in Portugal, who took the lead in ordering the rebuilding of Lisbon after the 1755 earthquake. The Marquis of Pombal imposed strict conditions on rebuilding the city, and the current grid pattern strongly differs from the organic streetplan that characterised the district before the Earthquake.

The Pombaline Baixa is one of the first examples of earthquake-resistant construction. Architectural models were tested by having troops march around them to simulate an earthquake. Notable features of Pombaline structures include the Pombaline cage, a symmetrical wood-lattice framework aimed at distributing earthquake force, and inter-terrace walls that are built higher than roof timbers to reduce fire contagion.

Today Baixa area has elegant squares, pedestrianized streets, cafes, and shops. Old tramcars, street performers, tiled Art Deco shopfronts, elaborately decorated pastry shops, and street vendors selling everything from flowers to souvenirs, all lend a special charm to the area.

Baixa was placed on Portugal's tentative list of potential World Heritage Sites in 2004.

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User Reviews

Got to love Nokia (10 months ago)
It was great, funny alsom
Thien-Kim Quach (11 months ago)
Super pretty neighborhood in Lisbon. Arguably where the high end stores and restaurants are, but within walking distance from bars and more of the nightlife. Walk around and do your shopping here, stop frequently for photos.
Red Light (13 months ago)
One of the busiest stops around but gets you around quick and easy.
K S (13 months ago)
This station is massive. There are 4 sets of escalators to get into the station. If there are accessibility concerns, check ahead to make sure the elevator is functioning. There are multiple ticket machines to buy tickets. The machine languages are available in Portuguese and English.
Simon Bates (17 months ago)
Wish Scottish railway stations were as efficient and well signposted as this!
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