Haljala Church

Haljala, Estonia

Haljala church was built originally between 1430-1440, replacing a wooden church from the previous century. The octogonal tower was completed in the end of 15th century. Haljala church was damaged in 1558 during the Livonian war and in 1703 during the Great Northern War when it was burnt down by Russian troops.

In 1831 it was damaged again when the tower and roof burnt down. The tower was rebuilt in 1865 at which time it acquired its present shape and size. The pulpit is made by Johann Rabe in 1730’s and organs by Gustav Normann in 1852.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ahti Bachblum (2 years ago)
Job. Welcome to worship services!
Ivar Männikus (3 years ago)
Nicely restored, I hope the final finishing works as well.
Oliver Veske (4 years ago)
A church with a powerful and impressive architecture, the contents of which are currently being renovated. You can also enter, but movement is limited due to the construction. Worth a visit!
Kaido Sööt (5 years ago)
I once stopped near there
Riina Antonis (6 years ago)
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