Japanisches Palais

Dresden, Germany

Japanisches Palais (Japanese Palace) is a Baroque building in Dresden on the Neustadt bank of the river Elbe. Built in 1715, it was extended from 1729 until 1731 to store the Japanese porcelain collection of Augustus the Strong that is now part of the Dresden Porcelain Collection. However, it was never used for this purpose, and instead served as a library. The palace is a work of architects Pöppelmann, Longuelune and de Bodt.

The Japanisches Palais was partly destroyed during the allied bombing raids on 13 February 1945, but was reconstructed in the 1950s and 1960s. The final reconstruction work continued until 1987. Today, it houses three museums: the Museum of Ethnology Dresden, the State Museum for Pre-History and the Senckenberg Naturhistorische Sammlungen Dresden.

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More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reza Kazempour (4 months ago)
Great place for spending time with friends, reading books and enjoying sunny day Pros: Next to Elbe Nice greenish view Furnitures Store Cons: No toilets around People are playing games with balls that may hit you…
Diaa Abulyazeed Soliman (4 months ago)
Could be better, but the experience is not bad.
Bianca Machado (9 months ago)
Occasionally it has some cool free art exhibitions.
Raghid Shehayeb (12 months ago)
The Palais Sommer is a really nice concept combining different cultural aspects and a nice atmosphere getting people together.
Zahra Farzadian (2 years ago)
Very nice terrace. A lot of vegan options. Good coffee.
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