Japanisches Palais

Dresden, Germany

Japanisches Palais (Japanese Palace) is a Baroque building in Dresden on the Neustadt bank of the river Elbe. Built in 1715, it was extended from 1729 until 1731 to store the Japanese porcelain collection of Augustus the Strong that is now part of the Dresden Porcelain Collection. However, it was never used for this purpose, and instead served as a library. The palace is a work of architects Pöppelmann, Longuelune and de Bodt.

The Japanisches Palais was partly destroyed during the allied bombing raids on 13 February 1945, but was reconstructed in the 1950s and 1960s. The final reconstruction work continued until 1987. Today, it houses three museums: the Museum of Ethnology Dresden, the State Museum for Pre-History and the Senckenberg Naturhistorische Sammlungen Dresden.

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User Reviews

木本真澄 (3 months ago)
This is unfinished palace for the son of Augustus the strong. The king intended to store and decorate it with a bunch of Japanese porcelains, but he died all the sudden and construction stopped. Now the palace is used as natural history museum.
Anumita Ghosh (3 months ago)
Not much to see... part of the building is renovated and hosts art exhibitions. However the park behind the museum is great for a walk by the river ... and gives some nice views of Dresden!
Vanitha Thangavelu (3 months ago)
Palace had some exhibition one side and other side it was due to work.Good place to walk around the palace. It's near to the river and had quite big park to walk around this palace.
Dale Brown (3 months ago)
Nice park outside and along the river. Lovely view.
Hugo Amoedo Machi (4 months ago)
Nice big garden in the back, facing the Elba
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