Albrechtsberg Palace

Dresden, Germany

Albrechtsberg Palace is a Neoclassical stately home above the Elbe river in the Loschwitz district of Dresden. It was erected in 1854 according to plans designed by the Prussian court and landscaping architect Adolf Lohse (1807–1867) at the behest of Prince Albert, younger brother of the Prussian king Frederick William IV.

After Prince Albert and his wife Rosalie had died, their younger son Count Frederick of Hohenau (1857–1914) lived in the castle until his death, whereafter his elder brother Wilhelm (1854–1930) took over the residence. In 1925 Wilhelm finally had to sell the castle and the territory because of gambling debts. The new owner was the City of Dresden. After 1930, the gardens were opened for the public and redesigned as a recreational area for the citizens of Dresden under Mayor Wilhelm Külz.

During World War II the premises were used by the SA, whilst from 1943 the castle was used as a children’s home. All the three Elbe castles were spared from the bombing of Dresden, however occupied by the Red Army, with depredations and damages as the consequences. In 1948 the City of Dresden had to sell the castle to the Foreign Economic Trade Ministry of the Soviet Union. The castle was renovated by the architect Koeckritz. After the redecoration the castle was opened as a hotel called Intourist. In 1951, the East German Jugendheim GmbH Berlin repurchased the castle, and since 1952 the City of Dresden is once again the owner. The building was used as a Pioneers Palace.

Today, the Albrechtsberg castle is used as a private hotel and catering school.

Architecture

Adolf Lohse designed the castle in a late Neoclassical style that was very characteristic for the mid 19th century. During the interior completion just the most high class materials were used, for example marble, the most kingly wood and the white sandstone from Saxony. Deciding for the composition was the style of the classicism. For this style, especially important is the Grecian and Roman antiquity; the Italian Renaissance and its traditionally application. The guide for the composition of the castle was the Ville d'Este close to Rome.

For the creation of the park, the Prussia garden architect Eduard Neide 1818-1883 was engaged. However, the court gardener Hermann Sigismund Neumann carried them out. Under the management of the court gardener, four landscapes were created. Those were crossed by curved alleys that are go over bridges and a viaduct. These alleys passe applied ponds, rocks and a waterfall.

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Address

Körnerweg, Dresden, Germany
See all sites in Dresden

Details

Founded: 1854
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tobias Schroeder (2 years ago)
The palace is not always open, only on a few specific days, but the surrounding park and the visual are already worth it. A great view of the Elbe River.
Alan Le Map (2 years ago)
Great event space too... And what a view! Be sure to visit the amazing arabic bathroom. Like a mini Mosque interior....
Goo Kehk Kwan (2 years ago)
Spectacular view from the height. Most parts of the building is fenced out but it is worth going apong for great shots.
Umar Nawaz (2 years ago)
Beautiful Palace with a lot of green grass and nice view of river passing nearby.
Brian. Armstrong (2 years ago)
Breathtaking views of the elbe and Dresden sky line
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