Arlington National Cemetery

Washington, D.C., United States

Arlington National Cemetery is one of the most famous cemeteries in the world. The United States military cemetery was established during the Civil War on the grounds of Arlington House, which had been the estate of the family of Confederate general Robert E. Lee's wife Mary Anna Lee. On June 15, 1864, the Arlington House property and 200 acres of surrounding land were designated as a military cemetery as Quartermaster General Montgomery C. Meigs wanted to ensure that Lee could not return to the site.

Today the cemetery is the final resting place for more than 300,000 veterans died in every American conflict, from the Revolutionary War to Iraq and Afghanistan.

The first soldier to be buried in Arlington was Private William Henry Christman of Pennsylvania on May 13, 1864. The most famous people buried to Arlington are Presidents William Howard Taft and John F. Kennedy. Also Kennedy's two brothers, Senator Robert F. Kennedy and Senator Edward 'Ted' Kennedy, and General of the Armies John J. Pershing are buried there.

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kevin P (19 months ago)
Amazing and humbling to walk these grounds. I was alone and just took an hour or so to walk around and take it all in. It was winter time so not many people around, and it was an inspiring thing to experience. There's definitely a somber but powerful feeling here as you see the price we pay for our freedoms.
Fred Newman (20 months ago)
I have visited the cemetery twice, once as a visit with my wife. The second was with the Honor Flight Tri State. In fact during the second visit, I suffered a stroke at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Fortunately, my recovery was complete because of excellent treatment at the Virginia Hospital. I loved everything about the Cemetery -from the grounds keeping to the appearance, conduct and dedication of the guards. I hope to visit again someday.
Jake Wolfe (20 months ago)
The cost of freedom... take it in. The grounds are beautiful, the sheer size and numbers of men and women, and their children, so impressive. The monuments very understated, far more so than the vibrant lives sacrificed to keep home and liberty safe.
Erik Mannery (20 months ago)
Beautiful grounds and lots of cool statues and memorials celebrating our history. I love the dedication to the military and the ceremonies throughout the day are not to be missed.
T L C (21 months ago)
Very special place. An honorable place for heroic veterans to rest in peace. The funeral service was very special too. The staff was helpful in locating my father's grave when I went there to visit him. He served in both Gulf Wars.
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