Neue Pinakothek

Munich, Germany

The Neue Pinakothek is an art museum in Munich. Its focus is European Art of the 18th and 19th century and is one of the most important museums of art of the 19th century in the world. Together with the Alte Pinakothek and the Pinakothek der Moderne it is part of Munich's 'Kunstareal' (the 'art area').

The museum was founded by the former King Ludwig I of Bavaria in 1853. The original building constructed by Friedrich von Gärtner and August von Voit was destroyed during World War II. The ruin of the Neue Pinakothek was demolished in 1949. Designed by architect Alexander Freiherr von Branca the new postmodern building with features such as arched windows, keystones, bay windows and stairways, opened in 1981. It combines a concrete construction with a stone facade design.

The museum is under supervision of the Bavarian State Painting Collections which houses an expanded collection of more than 3.000 European paintings from classicism to art nouveau. About 400 paintings and 50 sculptures of these are exhibited in the New Pinakothek. It has one of the world's leading collections of French Impressionists masterpieces like Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Édouard Manet, Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin etc.

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Details

Founded: 1853
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Malena G (13 months ago)
Exhibition of many great artisits
Malena G (13 months ago)
Exhibition of many great artisits
Brett Hilton (2 years ago)
We really liked this museum. It's beautiful inside and the ticket isn't expensive. There's a lot of interesting things to see. Great experience.
Brett Hilton (2 years ago)
We really liked this museum. It's beautiful inside and the ticket isn't expensive. There's a lot of interesting things to see. Great experience.
Costa Kat (2 years ago)
A fantastic collection of 18-19th centuries, mostly paintings and a few great sculptures. A stark contrast between old school and impressionist painting, some pointillism and old German and Dutch styles. Free admission, free WiFi, restrooms. Would be boring for kids, however and exposes quite some nudity. Good lighting and coaches for a small break.
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