Pinakothek der Moderne

Munich, Germany

The Pinakothek der Moderne is one of the world's largest museums for modern and contemporary art. Designed by German architect Stephan Braunfels, the Pinakothek der Moderne was inaugurated in September 2002 after seven years of construction.

In contrast to other cities Munich was not much affected by the Nazi regime's banning of modern art as 'degenerate art,' since only a few modern paintings were already collected by the Tschudi Contribution in 1905/1914, like the Still Life with Geraniums of Henri Matisse, the collection's first acquisition. Since 1945, however, the collection, previously exhibited in the Haus der Kunst, has grown quickly by purchase, as well as donations by individuals and several foundations. Various art movements of the 20th century are represented in the collection, including Expressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, New Objectivity, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Minimal Art.

In addition to a focused collection policy to individual priorities, the portfolio was extended in particular through the collections, Theo Wormland (surrealism), 'Sophie and Emanuel Fohn' (who rescued degenerate art), Woty and Theodor Werner (images of Paul Klee and the Cubists) and the collection of Franz, Duke of Bavaria with contemporary German painters such as Jörg Immendorff and Sigmar Polke.

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Details

Founded: 2002
Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

ILAYDA EZGI ZENGIN (15 months ago)
Great exhibition and great experience! It has a wide open space at the entrance that doesnt make you feel its crowded even in the rush days. One thing to be improved would be the path structure to follow while visiting the different rooms. It was not so clear at the beginning to understand where it starts and how it goes but other than that once it is understood it gives the perfect experience that a modern museum should give:)
Natalie Kim (16 months ago)
One of the best if not The Best art museum I've ever been anywhere in the world. From the building's architecture to the collections to the curation, this museum offers an absolute cultural feast. They also have an impressive design section at the basement that's not to be missed.
Liza Kim (17 months ago)
The museum is amazing! But personal is totally awful. For the first one security guy wasn't wearing a mask and was loud talking on phone, in the middle of exhibition. Also they take people away 10(!) minutes before they closing, so count your time wisely. At least they can speak English sometimes.
Milja (2 years ago)
Andy Warhol, Salvador Dali and Kokoshka and so many other great painters. If you are visiting Munich definitely go and see. Amazing and beautiful experience.
Malena G (2 years ago)
Interesting galaery
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