Pinakothek der Moderne

Munich, Germany

The Pinakothek der Moderne is one of the world's largest museums for modern and contemporary art. Designed by German architect Stephan Braunfels, the Pinakothek der Moderne was inaugurated in September 2002 after seven years of construction.

In contrast to other cities Munich was not much affected by the Nazi regime's banning of modern art as 'degenerate art,' since only a few modern paintings were already collected by the Tschudi Contribution in 1905/1914, like the Still Life with Geraniums of Henri Matisse, the collection's first acquisition. Since 1945, however, the collection, previously exhibited in the Haus der Kunst, has grown quickly by purchase, as well as donations by individuals and several foundations. Various art movements of the 20th century are represented in the collection, including Expressionism, Fauvism, Cubism, New Objectivity, Bauhaus, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art and Minimal Art.

In addition to a focused collection policy to individual priorities, the portfolio was extended in particular through the collections, Theo Wormland (surrealism), 'Sophie and Emanuel Fohn' (who rescued degenerate art), Woty and Theodor Werner (images of Paul Klee and the Cubists) and the collection of Franz, Duke of Bavaria with contemporary German painters such as Jörg Immendorff and Sigmar Polke.

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Details

Founded: 2002
Category: Museums in Germany

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

renata K (14 months ago)
Absolutely loved this place! Sundays cost is only 1€ and you can se amazing pieces. You also can eat on the cafeteria or drink coffee
L B (15 months ago)
One of the best place to go in Munich for real art galleries lovers. A lot of famous paintings there!!! To much emotions and impressions. Its like "cultural orgasm"!!! The ticket price is so cheap. Must visit in Munich!
Alison Venning (16 months ago)
We wanted to go the the Neue Pinakothek but it was closed for refurbishment so we went across the road to go here. I loved this elegant spacious building and its exhibits were very well displayed and curated. We particularly liked the design section with old kettles (!), bentwood chairs and everything in between. Highly recommended
John Taylor (16 months ago)
This is a wonderful museum with a very well curated and displayed permanent collection of automotive and industrial design, and modern art, sculpture, and photography. As of January 2019 there is an absolutely amazing display of a lot of the work by Mad King Ludwig II who is much derided as living in fantasy world. But when you really look at what was accomplished during his reign - architectural, urban design, advancement of technology, and even urban sanitation, one must realise there was much more to his legacy than is often portrayed.
Julia Prantl (2 years ago)
Great place to take guests - on a (rainy) Sunday in particular, especially if they are into art! The entrance fee is only 1€ then, and the exhibitions change constantly, so this is always worth your while and you learn something new every time you go! I thoroughly enjoyed the little history lesson that comes with reading the captions of the art pieces and the texts at the beginning of each exhibition room!
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